Why I Homestead in a Cold Climate - Lake Harding Association

Why I Homestead in a Cold Climate

Why I Homestead in a Cold Climate

By Micah Moen 72 Comments October 12, 2019


I think trying to homestead out here in
a northern climate it’s a lot like Star Trek doo-doo-doo-doo hey nobody Hey look hmm
I don’t have any more treats for you so I was away from the farm for the day
and I am just getting back I know some of you have to go to bed the answer is I
haven’t done it lately it’s not because they’re not trained like they go to bed
on their own look at this they get kind of freaked out when I shine the lighting alright goodnight ducks is what’s frozen salad cracked bummer
look it’s a little barn cat she’s out here watching me do chores
there’s Pablo away on the distance hey guys I’ll feed you in a minute good night Dex here’s water so my friends Ben and Meg over at the
Hollar Homestead have been doing this long 10 month road trip across America
really trying to explore the country and figure out where they wanted to
ultimately live they started out in California and really know just kind of
zig zag their way across the US and I think it hit most of the states I think
they were like three or four that they missed but you know you got to give him
a lot of credit for being able to do all that in 10 months so I was just watching
their video the other day where they announced where they were gonna live and
where they were planning on moving to and it’s just an awesome video I will
leave a link for it right up here it’s totally worth checking out for you guys
who aren’t familiar with them but I’m sure most of you are great story it’s an
amazing to see this family come together as they go across the country it’s well
told watch it but there was this one moment in their video which made me say
wait a minute and and it was it was basically Meg talking about how when
they were up here in New England I think they were in Maine at the time when they
kind of came to this conclusion their growing season is from June to September
that’s kind of a note they didn’t want to live here because really our growing
season is from June to September and then outside of that you’re pretty much
done ski and I can’t dispute that fact so that is very much true here like you
really shouldn’t be planting anything that’s not in a high tunnel before say
Memorial Day and then you know come the day of the equinox in September yeah
you’re you’re we should be expecting snow in any minute so so it is entirely
true that we don’t have a long growing season this that is just what it is but
I will say this if you think about it kind of nice having a short growing
season I’m gonna fully acknowledge living up here in a cold climate and
trying to be self-sufficient in a cold climate it isn’t for everybody there’s a
lot of things you’ve got to consider that you know people in a warmer climate
like if you’re in down south or you’re out west in California or even if you’re
in a more temperate place like you know the Pacific Northwest you know there’s
just a lot of stuff you don’t have to consider you don’t have to think about I
mean it’s not like you have to split a thousand of these things when you’re
living in Southern California but you also have to acknowledge that those
places have their own challenges in those places have their own problems and
as long as you can deal with the cold and as long as you can prepare and build
the right systems for whether it’s managing animals out in the cold or you
know keeping your heat in your house or figuring out how to grow enough food in
a short period of time so that you can preserve it and hang on to it there’s
just some awesome stuff about the short season I mean think about it how many of
you guys who are living in warmer climates who are you’re able to do three
distinct plantings and you still have stuff in your gardens come December
I mean how burnt-out are you with gardening by that point and then if you
also think of the other flipside of it all here in Vermont we’ll have like less
than ten days a year that are north of 90 degrees and when you think about our
summers overall they are absolutely incredible they are these crisp
beautiful warm days yeah we have enough rain mixed in but it’s not too humid
in just quite temperate I mean the summer months here are outstanding the
fall I mean the foliage will just sorry I just hit the wind chime what I was
saying is that this foliage is incredible out here I think trying to
homestead out here in a northern climate it’s a lot like Star Trek it’s not for
everybody but the people who like it are way into it try a simpler costume don’t
go for the full-on Klingon warrior I mean for me personally I love it in this
type of setting I love getting bundled up I like the
rituals that you have to have and the simplified life that has to exist and I
like how when you’re in the winter and you’re doing your chores you sort of
streamline everything to an exceptionally efficient bare minimum
just pushing things through and I don’t personally find anything wrong with the
fact that when there’s two feet of snow out in the pasture the only way you’re
getting around is by either snowmobile or snowshoes and as I’ve talked about in
a previous video when you think about life out here from a preparedness
perspective whether there’s some sort of global disaster or climate change just
takes this wicked hard toll on us all northern Vermont is not a bad place to
be I don’t know I’m just personally a big fan of life in the cold climate and
so when Meg Hollar just said that a growing season from June to September
was a deal breaker I just said what are you crazy I love you guys I mean it’s
not to say there aren’t the crappy things too out here you know having to
wake up every morning and plow and shovel getting stuck in snowdrifts not
being able to walk everywhere you might want to walk to having a frost line that
I think is about seven and a half feet deep that you have to dig for if you
want to bury water lines having your water freeze on your ducks on a constant
basis but that said I love being out here in the cold and I love the rest
period I think I’ve said in past videos that the bear is somewhat my spirit
animal and I think a big part of that is because I’m the type of person who likes
to work wicked hard and go at it really hard for
short bursts of time in a period of time and then for a long time I’d like to
hibernate and you know kind of hang out in my cave and lay low and and when you
have a long winter lets you do that so that is me standing on my soapbox
related to why I like it here in a cold climate so be sure to check out the
hollers video about their massive cross-country Odyssey and how they ended
up picking where they picked to settle and build their homestead I’m not going
to tell you where it is but I will say that it’s not Vermont and if you want to
learn more about us and how we manage our homestead here in northern Vermont
be sure to check out one of our other videos and I’ll see you next time here
on Gold Shaw Farm where we’re trying to build a farm in Vermont thanks

72 Comments found

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Theresa Threadgill

I appreciate that you enjoy your area, but for me I love Texas! Yes we have our issues but I was raised south of Mason dixon line. As an amputee I find it very difficult to get around in 6 inches or more of snow. My favorite temps are above 60 degrees. We get 2 to 3 months of colder weather and I really dislike it. But we grow best where we're planted. Have a good day and take care!

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Candide Thirtythree

We live in Louisiana and even though I was born here 6 decades ago, I have never acclimated to the heat. We recently sold most of our property in the south and bought land in the Rocky Mountains. I am past sick of the heat, I can't wait to be finished here so we can move, I love snow!

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Homestead Blessings

Not as cold where i live but cold enough and we are trying to homestead but at this point it is in the city. Trying to save money for land because I want out of the city badly. God bless

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Hannah Whitney

Yes! We love living and homesteading in Maine, even though it can be challenging. The beautiful summers definitely make it all worth it, and I think the short growing season makes us more efficient. Thanks for the great video!

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Orchardist’s Daughter

Love the Hollar’s! I’m thrilled that Vermont made the list! Oregon wasn’t on their list from the very beginning. 🙁 Yes, we used to be a great state! If I was not a 4th generation orchardist’s daughter and extremely proud of what Orchard View Farms has become, I too would consider Vermont! 🥰🍒

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Cynthia Hamblin-Perry

Love those rose colored glasses! After 30 more years you will probably be done with winter! It gets old after a while! Don't get me wrong – I love Vermont but I'm in my 60s now and winter wears on you. I do agree w/ having a break is nice but 3 months of winter would be fine! I wouldn't live anywhere that didn't have four seasons but would be nice to have more Spring so I'm not running around like crazy tying to get it all done in one month! You are right as the climate changes Vermont is probably a safer place to be. We'll see. Stay warm and headed over to catch up on the Hollars.

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Leslie from Morning Mist Gardens

Totally agree with you!

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Rebecca G

You had me at "not too humid". Oh boy, the summers here in the south are suffocating with the heat and the humidity. And then there's the pests and bugs that are constantly munching on you and anything you try to grow. I've lived here my entire life and it just gets worse every year as I get older.
I've just started following the Hollars too and enjoy their channel. I'm glad they made a decision and are ready to make their home in the new state. And it's a good state, I've lived there myself for a few years. BUT, after watching one of their videos where they were hot and dehydrated working in 80 degree temps (probably with zero humidity) I have to wonder how they will do when reality sets in there this summer in the state they chose.

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Jennifer Kooshian

I had the same argument as a fellow northerner 🙂 I love the downtime and rest built into a shorter growing season 💜

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Inez M

I am your "neighbor" over here in the Adirondack Mountains of NY. I've traveled all around the world, but still end up back here. The mountains, the people, the seasons- I can't stay away. =)

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Stoney Creek Heritage Farm

You almost had me talked into moving to Vermont, nice video!

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The Citystead

Awesome. There is something about the winter that brings a newness with every new spring. It's a renewed hope and excitement for the possibilities of that summer season. And winter is the best time to rest and reflect of the past year whike planning for the next. Also in a shtf way of thinking most of the fresh water is north, there is a reason the cold areas are where some of our oldest and largest cities.

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Vivian

GREAT VIDEO!!! I am from Minnesota and I remember that comment Meg made too….I guess you just can't judge a book by it's "snow cover" 🙂 I SO AGREE with you about hitting it hard all of our June through Sept. growing season but by gosh by the time it is over I am TIRED and ready for a nice LONG winter break…..Gods way of saying "you did good, now take a break"! Guess what you got me as a new subscriber by this video!!! So many things you said are spot on…and those rose covered glasses got a big belly laugh from me!!! Oh one more thing…when I have seen some videos lately of the souths huge poisonous snakes and spiders and fire ants….I say NO THANK YOU!!! I will GLADY take the cold and snow over those things alone, not to mention the horrid heat…who can work in the garden in heat like that anyway?! With that said I love the Hollar's, Roots and Refudge and VW Family Farm….to name a few that are from the south….I watch them everyday snuggled up by the fire on a cold MN winters day!

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Kimberley Friesenhahn

There is no place quite like Vermont. I was born here, joined the military and 20 years later I have returned. I lived all over the USA and in Europe and while each area has it's own beauty, Vermont is by far my favorite. It's not for everyone though, Vermont breeds a special kind of person. 😉

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Teal House Farm

Laura and I have always said if we moved anywhere it would be to a colder climate. She grew up in Connecticut and I don't mind the snow…the heat and humidity are bummers. Thanks for the video Morgan!!

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Jo Brown

I am also a northern climate person. We live in the mountains of BC and what I like about it is there are 4 distinct seasons (although with climate change they are starting to get a little murky). We are in our 60s now and were part of the back to the land movement of the 1970s. So we have been growing food here for 35 + years and do just fine storing up for the winter. We also heat with wood (mainly) which is wonderful and a lot of work. Yes and then there is snow removal. We don't keep livestock just because it brings in the predators – for us that means black bears and more recently grizzly bears. Also cougar, wolf, coyote. If you haven't checked them out – Little Mountain Ranch has a youtube channel and they are located at 150 Mile House in BC – definitely cold weather homesteading up there. Really enjoy your videos and the whole homesteading community on youtube. Take care.

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The Hollar Homestead

“It’s like Star Trek” 😂😂 great perspective from an insiders point! That rest period would be really nice, and I know the growing season is totally something you could work around. Plus that fall foliage….

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Built On The Rock Homestead

I could never live in Vermont. 90f is wonderful temps. Hate, hate, hate the cold. If I didn't have animals, I wouldn't get out of bed when it is below 45f. White stuff is pretty in pictures, but not on my stairs. I will say East TX humidity is not for me either. And growing food all year long is great. More opportunity. I do wish I had a few less cedar trees and more trees that drop leaves. Could use less rocks too. Time to go out and release the feather critters. It is 58f this morning. Suppose to hit 71f.

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Two Wild Onions Homestead

We are totally in agreement. A cold climate is for us as well!!

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180° From Average

Preach it Morgan Snow, Lord of The Northeast. The cold makes us hard like iron and keeps out wimpy peoples. Skål! <You should say the last sentence with a thick Russian accent for maximum effect.>

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Nancy Fahey

Been there, done that. No thanks. I put up with the bugs and the heat in Florida. I had 50° this morning. My plants love it. And between you and Al Lumnah, I get enough snow.

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Oh My Gourd

YAASS ! Love the Hollars. Love Star Trek. Love living in a northern climate; apparently full of love this morning, maybe more coffee is needed 👀

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Sara In SoPo

I’ll never leave Maine. So much to offer and very little annoyances like insane heat…or traffic! Lol. We don’t even use AC!
And YES to hibernation. Maybe I become tired of hibernating by April though.

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Northstar Prepsteader

I agree with all your reasons about the cold…especially the work hard for a few months and then have a rest period. By the time spring planting comes around, we are so ready to hit it again. Besides, there's something very invigorating and fresh about the cold!

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Little White Dory

Interesting theory on the darkness and those that seek cyclical time frames to operate at their best! I'm usually negative about the shortening days of fall but perk back up as soon as I sense the dead of winter, usually as being just after the new year….and my mother's birthday (happy birthday mom!) and the holiday rush, so about a week after new years. Then life starts to rush back in and seed selection and space requirements fill our heads.

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Mourning Glory

Have to agree about the growing season up North; It's not what people think it to be.
Lived in SE Michigan ( actually the Thumb of MI) and had a 6k sq ft garden, fruit trees, strawberry patch that would NOT stop producing gorgeous berries, herbs, flowers and also raised Runners and chickens with very few issues.
It was horribly cold last winter but can recall food growing in my garden all the way up to November.
Because of the erratic climate we now have it is possible to grow year round in most places.
We moved south to KY to be closer to family but miss MI weather, culture and overall ambience tremendously.
It was a Hygge climate that inspired a great deal of comfort foods, sitting near the fireplace sipping tea or coffee and looking forward to Spring planting season.

In all honesty, with the epidemics of viral flu and stomach viruses we NEED a good killing polar vortex to put those puppies to bed. The South stands very little chance in curtailing year round viral infections. I have had 3 since arriving in KY.
Oh, did I mention the day we arrived it was a "real feel" of 114?
Many things melted in the back of the moving trailer during the move here.
A double edged sword that one must choose which side to sharpen.
Keep up the good work and know that Vermont has the honor of hosting the two most brilliant and honest Americans ever born in North America; Helen and Scott Nearing. Hope you have a chance to read their story, 'The Good Life'.

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Eileen Palumbo

We live in north western Mass on the Vermont border. I like having 4 distinct seasons. After a snowy cold winter spring is so appreciated.

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The Honeystead

I like a good planned snow storm where I don’t have to leave the house lol it needs to start on a Friday around 8pm and stop on Saturday around noon… lol

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Lone Heron Homestead

Northern Minnesota gal here and I totally agree! Plus, the poisonous creepy-crawlies and slitherers aren't tough enough to live here.

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Haywire Homestead

We don’t get as cold as you. I don’t like super hot days. I also don’t like frozen buckets. Lol I guess I kinda like to be in between.

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No Worries Homestead

Good thoughts on the benefits of homesteading in a cooler climate.

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Rennells Suburban Homestead Prepping for Survival

Solar lights would help!

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Cynthia Fisher

I really enjoyed this. I’m a new sub and you are funny! Glad you love where you are. I love SW Idaho, I’ll stay put! I’ve never been to Vermont, but I’ve always wanted to see it. I hope some day I can.

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Bettina H.

I like winter too , though ours here have become kind of lame. There is something so invigorating about getting out in the snow and cold… Going for a walk or doing chores, you feel so fresh.
The Hollers' reveal video was really well done.

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Eva girl

Thank u for saying that.. upstate NY is awesome in the hills..they don't get to ski, sled, snowmobile, and u have to become efficient with what u have..

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Edmondson Off Grid Homestead

I totally agree with u Morgan. Who’s wants to garden for 9 months (maybe Jess @ Roots and Refuge;-). Thx for making the case for 🥶 climate farms.

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Lizz Vogel

Great content, I think there is an argument to be had that New England has one of the earliest harvest because we produce maple syrup! I can’t wait to tap our maples here in MA.

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Sunshine Farm

Thanks Morgan for sharing your perspective! That drone footage and the summer footage, goodness it is so stunningly beautiful in Vermont! We agree, seasonal living has its benefits for sure, especially with homesteading. The rest period is amazing, and because we don't get horribly hot summers, there is SO much we can grow during the 6-month growing season. It also teaches you to preserve really well. Climate change is also a really important point. Where we are is also a great place to live with the future effects of climate change. Love from NY! -Jenn

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The Grateful Sunites

Interesting thoughts. I think people are so different and what they like is different and so we tend to try to live in the climates we like best. I miss the Idaho Mountains something fierce. Long cold snowy Winters, shorts hot dry Summers and our growing season was mid June to mid September (not awesome for growing food). But Missouri has a lot of good to offer! It's just different. I wouldn't live in AZ if you paid me! I have a sister who lives there that really loves it though.

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keisha murray

The Hollars only missed Kansas and Nebraska. They are awesome. I'm in Texas in zone 8b. We can grow alot of things year round without cover. Tender plants can grow year round with even a single layer of cover most of the time. Our high yesterday was in the 70s. That is warmer than normal but not uncommon to get warm days scattered in like that all year. I never get burned out. There are days I don't want to get out and take care of a garden, but I never get so tired that I want to not be in the garden.

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Wilderstead

Great video Morgan!! We live in northern Ontario and wouldn't have it any other way!! Absolutely love the winter months for so many reasons. Ice fishing & making maple syrup are just a couple that come to mind. Cheers! Dave

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Simple Living Alaska

Great video, we moved from the PNW to Alaska and the growing season is super short compared to being able to grow year round but yes you are so right it is great for some folks and maybe not for others. Love Hollar Homestead 🙂

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Forgotten Way Farms

I agree! I am a North hardy girl, love the snow and the four seasons. I like how it makes me rest in the winter and I get rest and cozy time in 🙂 I use a greenhouse tunnels to help me have a longer season.

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Hey It's a Good Life

I like your points about the sprint vs. marathon, winter traditions, and mild summers… beautiful falls… makes sense. Thanks for sharing 🙂

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Wes

I love the snow don't much care for the -20 deg with the wind bowing 30+mph or the politics of MN however i would not think of moving anywere else.I think Life In Farmland,Bear bottom Acers,180 From Average, Jesse James Homestead, And others would agree.I hope. Feeding the animals in the morning when its -20 and dead cold really does get you going for the day.Or ready to sit by that wood stove and give it a big hug.

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JayneMarie

Good thoughts…
I’m in central Michigan which is not as chilled as Vermont, but I wouldn’t give up Michigan for anything!

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Prairie Plantgirl

There is definitely something to be said for the rest period of winter. It’s still a lot of work, but it is different work. A change is as good as a rest. From a Northern gardener to you – great video!

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B Havens

in parts of CA you want to NOT be growing in July and August, the rest of the year not a big deal, but at a certain level of heat makes plants as unhappy as a January blizzard. 🙂

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Little House Big Tent

Thank you for standing up for New England winters!! As a New England native, can't have all these southerners disparaging the most well rounded part of the country all over youtube 😉 love the Hollars, though 🙂

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Missy Weidenaar

LOVE your perspective on homesteading in the northern climates! Being from Montana, so much of what you're dealing with is so ridiculously familiar. I am loving watching what you guys are doing. Keep it up!

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Britt Mammenga

From zone 4b, I wholeheartedly agree! Thanks for sharing

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Green Dream Project

Good points. There are positives and negatives no matter where you live. We live in the desert. We have obvious water challenges. People may think we're crazy for that.👍

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Food Forest Permaculture

Hello .

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Joan Smith

Sorry, not feeling it. I'm siding with the "Hollar's". Just hearing you stomp around in crusted snow makes me chilly. LOL!

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Pfeiler Family Farm

Layers layers layers and I am not talking about chickens!!!

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Homesteading with the Heberts

The Hollars are great. You definitely painted the picture for what it is like for those of us in the north east. Great Job Morgan

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Heather Hineline

I absolutely love splitting firewood (by hand). It’s great exercise, and just a such a feeling of accomplishment when you see the big stack of wood you have. (Yes I have been told I’m nuts)😁❄️

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HalleluYAH Homestead

Great video! I think my fears of the cold are having to constantly heat (but we have to do that in OK anyway, just maybe not as long) and the frozen water and pipes. It seems we have frozen pipes every winter, and we really only have to deal with 2 or 3 "cold spells", and the rest of the winter is mild. It's been sunny and in the 60's the last 2 days! I do think I could adjust to the cold though. I love OK though and likely won't be leaving anytime soon. 😁 Thanks for sharing!

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Start From Seed Homestead

As a Canadian, I'm pretty well restricted to a short summer growing period. My only relocation option to push that out into the spring and fall is moving to the west coast, where parts of BC are as warm as NC, but it's cost prohibitive to buy land there since that's the only part of the country that warm. Now, I have to admit, if I were American I probably would have picked NC for homesteading as well, it does kind of seem idyllic for that purpose. But I 100% agree that having a long winter provides the necessary rest to come back at the following summer's growing season with a full tank and a level of excitement I don't think I could match if I only had a couple months downtime. Snow has it's downsides, as an adult I feel like it only has downsides, but the peace and quiet of winter gives me the energy I need to push hard all summer. Up north we also have less pest pressures because of the intensity of the freezes, which is a big plus. The resiliency to climate change is another strong point, like you say, but more importantly, I don't think I could survive the intensity of the summers that far south!

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samantha abt

Well said.

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baamonster2

I grew up in southern california, so I have a real hard time with the snow and darkness. I'm more of a dry heat type of guy.

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Tap o' Noth Farm

Here, here! We market farm in Scotland, 57 degrees N, 270M above sea level, snow can fall between Oct-May.Our veg growing season (we're a CSA veg farm) is 22 weeks. Summer….it mostly rains….but yes, we have down time ('down time') in winter. Day time temp today it's 21 F which is quite mild. And a sauna really helps. And I love seeing all the bloody weeds die in autumn, then I can relax…a little.

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Dars HayFarmer14

😂😂 ❤it! I totally get it. It's hard to explain I miss the snow…if i was rich i would probably live elsewhere in the the summer because it is long crazy hot and no rain… but I enjoy the long growing season sometimes and mild winters sometimes lol I am amped in spring but fall won't lie i'm done.. my husband's done.. we are tired ready for the season to change and then we are tired of mud and wish it would snow lol. It's a never ending cycle. I went raised in CA moved to northern Idaho with my horses and … yep back to CA mostly because i got offered a really good job. My husband 5th generation cattle rancher, almonds hay, pears, etc… CA to WY diesel mechanic and back to the family farm in CA lol it's ok that's how we met got married started our own farm, cattle program and we have a son. We have non stop talked about moving out of state for soo many reasons. Our goal is someday we can farm full time together instead of my husband working in town full time plus farming full time… we live where we can't afford! Our families have been here for generations. My husband and his dad are the only ones on his side still farming. My side it's me and my dad has a sister and 2 cousins with commercial cattle and sheep.. most of them are out of state. We struggle with permits, regulations, etc… feels like the state is against you making it impossible to survive as a farmer. I won't go into details. It's hard to get by let alone ahead. However every time we have said that's it! let's sell and move! we have ended up with an amazing opportunity hence we are still in CA. If we leave we have 30+ cows, 7 horses, 6 dogs, etc… to move with us. We have land leases we would never get back. In a nut shell We own 3 acres lol couldn't afford it without rental income it was our max budget even with a good down. We lease 500+ irrigated acres and around 5,000+ mountain acres for cattle and horses. Soo it's hard if starting fresh no generation hand me downs we would be gone already. I don't know yet if this is our forever farm but we dive in and do it right. We got our little farm with 2 houses for land value. It's a great investment haven't created debt rebuilding and could easily sell any time. We are hanging tight but keeping an eye out. It's not about us anymore it's about our sons future and building something sustainable. I love YouTube watching everyone's seasons, opinions, ideas, crops, successes and failures. It helps me make better decisions along with such a wonderful learning experience. Thank you for sharing

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Wes

Northern climate We can lay on are grass(no fire ants,swim in are lakes and rivers,(no water snakes or aligators),Pick up yard debris( no snakes or scorpions)there is one winter crop( ice fish) only thing going to kill us up here is cold (we are all fire bugs) When spring comes in march and the high is 20 f we can put on are t-shirts again (and shorts) does that cover it.

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John Martinez

Love your videos there funny but educational, keep up the quacking

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Alfredo De La Fe

Hey man, actually been enjoying your videos. You seem pretty down to earth and have dealt with a lot of the issues I have been thinking about. Anyway, I grew up in NYC and have been looking in upstate NY and PA (PA I have kind of written off because every property we looked at either didn't come with OGM rights or the neighbors had fracking going on- the thought of my well water getting contaminated is an issue I just don't want to worry about) but have been moving on to other places in North East and further South. Had not considered Vermont. My biggest issue is having access to affordable and GOOD healthcare. What are your thoughts on this in VT?

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Robert Orr

Yep. Star Trek. Star Wars. The Planet of Hoth during wintee. I really enjoy your channel, and your stories. Thanks for plowing ahead. I think you will be rewarded.

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Isaac

Just went to white river jct. VT last week and the weather is very comfortable, I cant stand the heat, I like parts of the south like TN and NC but even there is too hot in the summer, I will always be in a cold area, whether its the northeast, northern midwest, or northwest, it is where ill be.

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AnnaSophia Balbuena

I live in Central New Hampshire and I friggin love that we dont have a bunch of deadly bugs and snakes and crocodile that can eat you while on a walk one day.

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Leela Starsky

Fall foliage and cold would be a big WIN for me!! Every Summer here (Melbourne Australia) is FIRE SEASON, and literally hell on earth. Not to mention the lack of water…

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Marilyn Hukill

We moved from a 32 acre farm in NE Ohio to a 6 acre in South Mississippi. I couldn't handle the cold anymore. I miss the leaves and first snow.

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Mary Takaoka

I'd like to see the inside of your house too.

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