Personal Identity: Crash Course Philosophy #19 - Lake Harding Association

Personal Identity: Crash Course Philosophy #19

Personal Identity: Crash Course Philosophy #19

By Micah Moen 100 Comments August 13, 2019


Crash Course Philosophy is brought to you
by Squarespace. Squarespace: share your passion with the world. Who is The Doctor? Is it this guy?
Or this one? How about him? As any good Whovian knows, the answer is yes,
all of them. But, also, wait: No. In the show Doctor Who, each incarnation of
The Doctor has a completely different body, different mannerisms, likes and dislikes and,
to some extent, memories. So… how are they all The Doctor? Science fiction is great at giving us scenarios to grapple with that seem far-out and only barely possible. But when you think about it, the issue of Who is Who isn’t that much more clear-cut in real life. The fact is, you can take the same questions I asked about The Doctor, and ask them about anyone. Like…me. I mean, are these people any more similar
to each other…than these people? [Theme Music] Last time, we talked about identity – or basically, what makes an object the same over time. And the concept can get more complex when we talk about our own identity, or the identity of others. When talking about ships or trees, we might be willing to say yeah, ok, that’s just not the same thing it used to be. But when we’re talking about, say, me! I have the strong belief that I’m the same person that mom and dad brought home from the hospital back in 1980. I’m that same kid that cut his hand open
on that broken flower pot – I have the scar to prove it! And there’s some guy in the future who’s still going to be me, even though he’ll be all stooped over, and wrinkled, and gray.
At least, I hope. And you probably think of yourself in the same way – that you’ll keep being the same person, from birth to death. But, you could argue
– and some have – that the only thing that really remains constant
about you your whole life is your name. And for some of us, even that changes! Philosophers have struggled with the issue
of personal identity for a long time, trying to find that special something – that
essential property – that makes you you, the thing that preserves
your identity through time, and through all the changes that come with
it. Let’s take a look at some of ideas they’ve
come up with. First there’s the Body Theory. This is sort of the default position that
most people have – and the assumption that Doctor Who messes
with so badly. It says that personal identity persists over time because you remain in the same body from birth to death. Now, in a sense, that’s true – I don’t know anybody outside of, like, Freaky Friday that’s had a body transplant. But, it’s not like you consist of all of the same, identical stuff that you had when you were born. You’ve sloughed off and replaced your outer
layer of skin, for example, hundreds of times so far. Your red blood cells only live about 4 months
before they’re cycled out. Even your skeleton is constantly being remodeled. So, kind of like the Doctor – or the Ship
of Theseus – you’re constantly being replaced by new
physical versions of yourself. And if you are your body, then how much of
you can change until you become a new you? Can you get a haircut? What if you lose or
gain a lot of weight? Or grow a beard? Or put John Travolta’s
face on your face? Let’s go over to the Thought Bubble and explore the ideas of our bodies, and ourselves, with some Flash Philosophy! 20th century English moral philosopher Bernard
Williams proposed a thought experiment, to make us consider where we think our personal
identity resides. It goes something like this:
You and I have been kidnapped by a mad scientist. He tells us that, tomorrow morning, he’s
going to transfer all of your mental content – all of your beliefs, memories, personality,
everything – into my brain. And then he’s gonna move all of my mental
content into your brain. Presumably, this is how he earned the title
of mad scientist. But he also tells us that, after the procedure
is complete – and your mental content is in this body,
and my mental content is in yours – he’ll give one of the bodies a million dollars,
and the other body will be tortured. And he’s decided to let you pick which body
gets the torture and which one gets the cash. What do you decide? Your answer should give you a clue about where you think your identity lies. Thanks, Thought Bubble! Now our friend John Locke didn’t cotton to the idea that the most essential aspect of a person is her body. For Locke, the thing that makes you you is
the non-physical stuff – your consciousness. But Locke recognized that we don’t maintain a single consciousness over the course of our entire lives. We go to sleep every day, but, when we wake up, our conscious selves remember who we were the day before. So Locke posited a Memory Theory of personal
identity. He believed that your identity persists over time, because you retain memories of yourself at different points, and each of those memories is connected to
one before it. Now, we don’t remember every single moment – I mean, do you remember what you ate for lunch last Tuesday? But you can probably remember a time when you did remember that – like, say, last Tuesday afternoon. And if you can remember that version of yourself, then you’re still connected to the Tuesday-at-lunch
person, through a chain of memory. And this process can take us back a lot farther
than last Tuesday. Locke said that if you can remember back to
your first day of kindergarten, you maintain a memory link to that person. Sure, your Mom also remembers that day, but
no one remembers it from the inside – the butterflies in your stomach; the way your new shoes felt stiff after a summer of running barefoot. That’s your memory, and since it’s yours, you must be the same person who experienced that memory. The memory theory actually makes a lot of sense, but it’s got some problems of its own. First off, no one remembers being born. Now that’s not a bad thing, really – I mean, I imagine none of us would really want to recall that particular experience – or the couple of years that we spent after
that, pooping in our pants. But, if personal identity requires a memory, then none of us became who we are until our first memory, which means we all lost at least a couple
years at the beginning. What’s more,
if you’re committed to this view, you have to accept that people stop being
the same person if they lose their memories. So, say a person begins to suffer from dementia. Once he’s lost the ability to remember his
past, does he stop being that person? So the memory theory presents problems for
both the beginnings and ends of life, but there’s also the issue of false memories. Memory, after all, is notoriously tricky. We know that a group of eyewitnesses are likely
to recount the same event very differently. So, how do we know that the memories we have
are accurate? And if they’re not – if things didn’t
actually happen the way you remember – then how do those faulty memories influence
your identity? Do they make you a partially fictional person? So, at first, Locke’s theory seems to have
some advantages over the Body Theory, because consciousness and memory persist through
your body’s physical changes. But, after just a little interrogation, you
find that memory is pretty tenuous too. Now, here’s the sixty-four-thousand-Altairian-dollar
question: Does any of this really matter? Like, who cares if there’s a you that persists
from your birth to your death? Maybe all you feel like you need to know is that your self has to go to work and pay bills, and that’s plenty. But the matter of personal identity isn’t
just a conceptual puzzle. It’s also deeply important when you’re
thinking about how you should live your life. For example, do you believe that you have
obligations to particular people in your life? Well, if those people don’t persist as distinct identities, then your obligations might not either. And the same goes for how people think about
you. Your boss only has to give you the raise she
promised you, if each of you remains the same person you
were when she made the promise. In fact, if next Friday, you’re not the same person anymore, she doesn’t even have to pay you! The fact is, we’ve all built our lives and
our society on the expectations that individuals will continue to be who they are, unchanged – and those people expect the same thing out of you. So now you can see…this really is your problem.
You expect a paycheck. You expect people to keep their promises. But as we learned back with Clifford and James
and epistemic responsibility, you don’t just get to believe things without
reasons. So if you think you deserve that paycheck,
you need to figure out why. Today we talked about personal identity. We considered the two main answers people give to the question of where your identity lies – in your body, or in the connected memories
of your consciousness. We found some pretty significant problems
with each of them, and then we talked about why the persistence of identity is actually something you should care about! Next time, we’ll return to this issue, to talk about whether you really need the idea of a “you” that persists over time. If you still exist then, I hope you join me. This episode of Crash Course Philosophy is
made possible by Squarespace. Squarespace is a way to build a website, blog
or online store for you and your ideas. Squarespace features a user-friendly interface,
custom templates and 24/7 customer support. Try Squarespace at squarespace.com/crashcourse
for a special offer. Squarespace: share your passion with the world. Crash Course Philosophy is produced in association
with PBS Digital Studios. You can head over to their channel and check out a playlist of the latest episodes from shows like Coma Niddy, Deep Look,
and First Person. This episode of Crash Course was filmed in
the Doctor Cheryl C. Kinney Crash Course Studio with the help of these awesome people and our equally fantastic graphics team is Thought Cafe.

100 Comments found

User

333 Studios

I fell into depression after my self and free will fell out the window. I don’t know how to experience a center again. An identntiy or whatever you want to call it. Someone help me find a philosophical framework for a new center or a new way to operate without a center

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Perceptron Perceptron

no turkish subtitles 🙁

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Acechao111

So is this kind of Philosophical study featured in Problems of the self? Metaphysics? Or more like, Philosophy of mind? I'd love to know where it falls into to be able to look into it further, it seems a lot of philosophy of 'self' or 'identity' is a little bit different to this issue of personal identity and what makes us who we are. I'd appreciate help!

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Mason Gammon

Changing "Memory" to "consciousness" may fix the flaws there. From the moment your born your mind is active and you could trace your consciousness back to the very beggining whether you remember it or not doesnt matter you still know you had thoughts last tuesday and the day you were born and they never stop. If we are our thoughts then it doesnt matter if we remember them.

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Julien Perret

i love you

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Adam Hill

The greatest aspect of your show, allowing us the freedom to choose our opinion on the matter, is also THE MOST frustrating. I'm trying to do my philosophy homework, and whilst I have some great facts, I have no idea what to think as you argued both sides so well. Thanks for the amazing videos!

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kristian perez

I think of identity as the collection of the information that was ever associated with you, in other words your history,

Your body and mind may change but that's just another part of your history which when looked at from beginning to end gives a whole identity,

I'll use myself as an example,

It is true that, physically speaking, I am not the same person I was ten years ago, however that does not mean that the Kristian Perez from ten years ago is a different person from me, because the Kristian Perez from ten years ago is actually a part of my history up until this point,

Likewise, even if I forget who I am sometime in the future, that does not change the fact that, historically speaking, I will remain the same, because even if I don't remember it, my history can still be traced back to the Kristian Perez that's writing this comment,

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Warwick The Kingmaker

Locke was ringht but his onclusion was wrong. What he actually discovered was that the person that is "you" literally only exists in the current instance. 5 seconds ago was another you that is only linked to you by memory. Therefore "you being born" was not "you" at all. Literally everything about that person no longer exists, except DNA, but DNA can´t be the sole cause either.

From another person´s perspective however, it is an entirely different question because if I talk about a certain Martin for example, I´m refering to the personality and overall traits of that person. If a mad scientist were to transplate his brain and all his organs into another person, that new person would be Martin, and if Martin would be killed and cloned, the clone would be Martin. If he is just cloned and the clone survives, they are both Martin. And the definition of Martin changes as he himself slowly changes with time.

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UNnaturaL

One more problem with memory theory would be the people with multiple personality disorder. Who would they be exactly ?

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Yaleel Mtwlk

I have a question here, if I'm changing constantly, and the require for a promise is to stay the same person/agree on certain things, then, how would I keep a promise to myself? how would I know if this is myself "Right now" talking, or is it the feel of "having to keep a promise" to a person that no longer exists!! And I know for a fact, that that person changed their mind "myself" and wish to do a different thing, given the current circumstances. What if the previous person "the old me" was sain, and the current me is crazy, should I lie to myself? The main point guys, is that am having a difficult time keeping a promise to myself, I always find a way out of it, can you help me figure a way in? Or am I right?

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Georgia Orrill-Legg

Hank is so cute! Look at the baby photos

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Jon

How come you didn't mention the cartesian ego theory i.e. soul theory? That's a pretty main alternative for theory of personal identity. I think it's the simplest and explains all of our intuitions and so is probably correct.

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Dito

This would be a good moment for god to prove his godlyness and explain it.

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Saidi Lai

please help me about online document that can assess more material about this session

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Gargoyle

I want that mug!

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Gregory Kudzin

I quoted you in my A Level RE exam.

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Chris Ruby

Existential crisis go!!

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sqlblindman

We are the path we take.
We are the choices that we make.

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Irwin Crook

"Put John Travolta's face on your face" lol

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Jeff Spencer

CAN'T. STOP. WATCHING. CRASH. COURSE. PHILOSOPHY.

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That Asshole

We all are different from when we were born because our personality and minds change when we encounter and experience new things. So we are changing rather consistently and sometimes in small ways in others more radical ways.

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Arief Rakhman

Hank, are you sure you're not a human clone? 😅

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Audrey the cat nerd

The lack of 10 in the thumbnail is… disappointing

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Gary McSpadden tech

I believe that you are your memories, and the fact that those memories are not accurate is not even relevant. And yes my dad is still walking around but he died a couple of years ago.

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Wayne Blake

LIGHT SKIN BLACK PEOPLE ARE BLACK AS BROWN SKIN BLACK PEOPLE! DARK SKIN BLACK IS NOT SUPERIOR TO OTHER BLACK PEOPLE!

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Durell Nelson

Do you think Hank got paid after this episode

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Nub B

Borderline personality disorder? Any info on finding my identity

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esf asia

Your video kinda changed me a little.

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ThisIsDK

Damn YOU must be paid. I watch like, 3 channels represented or produced by YOU

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Long trinh

Your identity is not only your memory of yourself but rather everyone's memory of yourself, including yourself.

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Silas Lorde

Is there a realm of thought where we only exist from moment to moment? Or is that some way of just accepting ignorance and not asking questions because if you only last a moment what does it matter? I'm not talking physically existing more like the things which make you, you are constantly evaluating each other voting in and out others to try and make a more perfect island even if it is only perfect to the inhabitants of the island. You are who you are in this moment and if in the next you are a cowboy then you are a cowboy because that's all there is to it. Every possible adjective was or is at one point not applicable to us and we may have adopted it suddenly or graydally but by doing so we changed who we are. The universe wasn't always this big at one point it was small and Mother Theresa was just Theresa at one point. In the moments we are deciding who we are in terms of our human limits we can't become an earthquake or a supernova now but maybe one day we will become part of a plate tetonic and a star. I suppose I'm offering a subjective perspective but who knows what I'll think when I press COMMENT maybe I'll change and see a concrete world becoming a new person only a shadow of my former self.

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الأمل Hope

thanks for the arabic translation

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naufil manasiya

Pay check is given to a action/activity and not to a specific human … it's an reward mechanism keep motivation on… Your boss gives you bonus for extra effort …he is not giving you any reward… If someone else acted in similar way…he would reward them too … At least in Ideal world … I know there are biases and people discriminate upon their prejudices … But it's entirely different thing ….

And what you feel and what you do can be entirely different things… You can go against your nature … against your identity …if time forces to be…the best example is not so strong but none the less an alliance between racially superior white Hitler and dark coloured Japanese … I am sure that Hitler felt that he was working against himself… but none the less he did… because he saw no other options

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Nicholas Treat

Time for more Asian philosophy!
Buddhism rejects the idea of a self for two primary reasons: the first is that everything is both constantly changing and dependant on everything else and thus empty of any sort of "sef-ness". We can look at a tree and we can think of it as an independent tree, it it easily definable from other trees, but with closer understanding we see that it comes from the tree that dropped the dead that grew, and that earlier tree also had and even earlier tree from which it came, and also had the conditions of water, fertile soil, sunlight, and anything else that helped it become the tree we see. But to say that this tree is an independent entity would be to ignore all of the above, and isnt realistic. The same is true for people. We have DNA that, while unique, does not come out of nowhere, as well as thoughts, preconceptions, and preferences that are developed by those around us and our personal experiences. If you have a father, or don't have a father, you are shaped by that, and without that influence you wouldn't be you. So it appears that a self independent from anything else is merely a mental construction that helps us live our everyday lives. But these influences change over time, and would leave you utterly unrecognizable to your past self, as well as a current inability to recognize the future version of yourself. We can all agree that we are not exactly the same person as we were when we had our first memories, there's simply too little in common, but Buddhism takes it a bit further and asks how long in the past are we the same person we are now? 10 years? 5? One year? Six months? One? A week? Yesterday? When we woke up? A second ago? There is no easy answer to this, as every moment we exist we are influenced by litterlally infinite amounts of new conditions, our bodies never stop changing, we receive new information constantly, and we form opinions based on temporary feelings and long held, but subtly changing beliefs.
The second reason Buddhists reject the self is that there is no clear locus of control, nothing to point to a "soul" that is independently "us" for the duration of our lives. They require that the soul is something that is fundamentally you, and thus has to be in charge all the time. It's not our body, which many would easily agree with, it's not our feelings, not our memories, not our consciousness, because as was said in the video, there are periods where we are unconscious. Since there's nothing that is identifiably "us" that is always in control there is no self, according to Buddhist philosophy.

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Maiq The Liar VII

You don’t have to remember when you were 4, just have to remember a time where you remembered a time where you remembered.
If you only have a weeks worth of memory you have a continuity as long as you have some memory for some time as last week is connected to the previous

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Bilal Hussain

I love all the Doctor Who references in this, brought a smile to my face

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Countchocula Dje

I would argue that any sense of identity changes constantly. All you can be is the sum of your parts, and due to different addends are introduced with every passing moment, your sum is changing. If you are your sum which is changing, then your identity is constantly changing. So it is pointless to try to have identity, rather accept your nothingness

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Nostalgia N

I would say a personal identity is a collective mind of ones experiences and expertise, what makes a person themselves and what identifies them as who they are is their actions and reactions throughout their lives, it's not all the memories of the past, it's the valuable memories, the ones that had us act upon them.

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Ioan Jivan

it seems like the mad scientist is a meme in philosophy

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STEEL ALLOY DIONYSUS

i’d really like someone to argue with me on another theory, i believe that the body and memory theory all are thinking about it too hard. i believe that identity resides in perception. i am myself because i think i am myself, and everyone else believes i am myself. the ship of theseus is the ship of theseus because i retain the idea that it is. identity is not a physical thing and you’re never going to come up with an infallible theory about the physical essence of an identity. identity is a cognitive phenomenon, and cannot be explained within the constraints of any noumenon

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Serena Casanova

This one was a bit mindblowing!

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Brighton Betoit

For those of you asking about soul theory: You must first prove you have a soul by assuming you do not.

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NinjaBluefyre

I would ask that both of us get the money and the torture.

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AsharOzborne95

My solution to the puzzle: I offer to Hank to take the torture in his body in exchange for half of the money.

My logical argument I use to persuade him is this:
Since my mind is the younger of the two, it is probably the most resistant to torture. The downside is that Hank's body is probably the least resistant to torture, however, it is the lesser of two evils, since living with long-term mental trauma can be argued to be worse than living with long-term physical trauma. And my mind stands the biggest chance of escaping torture with minimal mental trauma.

But Hank asks, why do you get half the money, shouldn't you get it all since you're taking the torture?

I say no, because, yes it is my mind experiencing the torture, but it's also Hank's body that's suffering the physical duress and strain of the torture.

Therefore if we're switched back again via some circumstance, it only makes sense that we split the money equally since we both took half the suffering.

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Dakota

Is there an existing argument that you are owed the wages of past-you's labor on the principle of "next of kin"? If so, who's argument is it and what's it called?

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Sez Monsta

Alright here’s my two cents,

Identity is an illusion created for our society. If we were say caveman we wouldn’t care about our identity we would just do what we have to do to survive.

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Sez Monsta

Another error with the memory theory is it ignores your subconscious

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There is only one KEK and Pepe is his prophet

no I don't think I'm the same person that I always was in fact I'm glad I'm not if I were to meet the 13 or 15 or 20 year old version of myself now I would probably hate them

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There is only one KEK and Pepe is his prophet

the thing is and yet that personality traits are fairly consistent across time, if I'm not mistaken the literature indicates that people that are neurotic as adults were fussy as infants meaning that they have the same traits across time

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There is only one KEK and Pepe is his prophet

well I am firmly of the opinion that if I get Alzheimer's I need to die because I do not want to experience a losing my mind losing myself

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Olivia Hurd

This was really as I was writing a paper comparing Kant and Hume's views on the self in my online philosophy class!

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JournoGuy

Where those sweet sweet citations at?

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Delian Jay

This subject still gives me a headache. I've been thinking about it for 3 years, since my philosophy classes in high school, but I still don't have any answers. I feel like everyone has good arguments, but at the same time, each argument has major flaws, but then don't appear as ones if you really think about it, like, it never ends (just see the comment section). I have an opinion on every single subject that I know of (can't have an opinion on smth you've never heard about, right?), but not this one, it's really frustrating.

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Rivet Ace

Identity is a label applied by humans, or possibly by other sentient beings as well. Therefore you are you if the majority of people around you (including you) believe you are you. This can change (if I somehow am convinced that I was possessed/replaced by Elvis and I convinced everyone around me, I say I would be Elvis, but good luck getting that to happen).

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Gabriel Russell

I like to believe that our identity it something that has to deal with our personal expeirence in life. If i were to have my memeroies erase,i would consider my self to differenet because i would have loss of my personal memories

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Kehinde Gbadamosi

What about DNA

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Carl Bratcher II

Energy cannot be created or destroyed, it can only be changed.

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Abdullah Ansar

our DNA can be our essential property as well as our biological relation, they never change or finish.

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J

I think a more pressing example of personal identity are people put in comas or who have had massive neurological damage. If we imagine a married couple and one of them is injured in such a way, when does the surviving spouse' obligation end? Some would say never, because the coma patient is still alive. Others would argue that the body is still alive, but that the person, the identity, is gone.

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Kayla Levay

Gregory House best doctor. Hands down.

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v1e1r1g1e1

A transgender person will claim that they are the ''same'' person, legally and socially, as that which they were before the reassignment surgery / procedures.  Further, given that the Law in most countries would still prosecute a transgender person for any crimes done (if discovered) when the transgender person was of the prior form, it is clear that the Law regards a ''person'' as an entity of a distinctly continuous DNA.   Therefore, ''gender'' and ''person'' are (now) two different things.

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Andrew Ignatyev

The thing is that you use memories from the beginning of your life otherwise you won’t be able to talk, walk, you won’t have all your basic behavioral and emotional stereotypes. The fact that you don’t have memories about actions doesn’t mean that you don’t have all other types of memories that define you as a person.

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Hocus Pocus

Davros… lulzies.

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Francis Mausley

I hope to live as a spiritual being…"Self has really two meanings, or is used in two senses," "one is self, the identity of the individual created by God." "The other self is the ego, the dark, animalistic heritage each one of us has, the lower nature that can develop into a monster of selfishness, brutality, lust and so on." ~ Baha'i Faith

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Andrés Felipe Londoño Jiménez

If I worked 30 days of the month, and I loose my memories in an accident the 31th of that month, I loose my identity. Then, does my boss has to pay me for that month of work?

Even more, if I die, should she still pay that money to my account?

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Hussien Mohammed

لاڤيو

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Julie Diana

I don't think memory defines identity. I believe that it's based on our conciousness and the only cells not replaced at some point in our life is cells in our cerebral cortex. So this makes me think thats where our soul/conciousness is

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Amare Adonai

I love how he uses she when referring to the boss in last example. How feminist of him.

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EDUARDO BATZ MORALES

hi

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eatsleepplayrepeat

I'm getting some strong Ghost in the Shell vibes from this.

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Couro Athie

i deserve the paycheck because my past self wrked hard it for and would like my future self to have the check

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Shane Gregory

What about Aquinas and hylomorphism

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MIKE

There are many people who have short bursts of memory from birth or as babies… 🙄 (just saying it's not as concrete as you say, yes no one has complete memories of being a baby, but there are exceptions…)

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alex arnoldi

there are so many doctor who references in these videos

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Gaytrappunzel

can you do gender

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Something You Said

It seems to me that if there can never be a definitive determination of what constitutes an "identity" the term can never be better than relative.

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PhiliChez

I think personal identity is composed of the continuity of existence itself in the form of our memories and brain patterns and that slow subtle changes don't disrupt that continuity. This does happen to imply a method of moving minds between substrates that sustain them, that being that if substrates were exchanged fluidly where one offloads one function at a time but all functions still work together. I like to think of this in terms of mind uploads. One function at a time, yet still a complete and continuous experience then your mind has been transferred.

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Dolly Vangani

O M G his BABY PICTURES HANK U R SO CUTE

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That One Guy.

You can sometimes back up memories objectively through photos, and video.

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em harris

philosophers: the only thing that stays the same: your name!
me: trans silence

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Jay Dot

memory has been fascinating to me since i listened to malcolm gladwell's podcast and the double episodes about memories. what he said that really sticks with me is "the lesson of that story is that only a fool accepts the evidence of his own memory for gospel. the lesson of this story is: we are all fools".

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Internet Warrior

Why is everyone without a confirmed gender female?

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Shanice Codner

Mabey your personal identity is like money or free will its a concept that is required for our society to function more deeply for us to function as individuals?!

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willisverynice

Most sci fi is fantasy, but dr who is really fantasy.

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1bombastic1

Great video love it,,,,

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1bombastic1

This is so philosophicalcalcalcal I love it

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Kert Gemmuel Fronteras

Spiritual Theory?

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Leila Nambinga

To answer the last question I believe I deserve a lot of money because my numerology says so

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elio palombi

Lol why am I binge watching crash course instead of revising for my exams tomorrow?

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Dooie Poen

Mate i love this guy hahaha

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Al

Did anyone else notice that he’s consistently using feminine pronouns (she and her). It’s a breath of fresh air 🙂

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User

ma x st ir ne r

cogito ego sum

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Edelweiss W

DNA???

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Hbgs Nndd

nani

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Elijah Vale

If you eat something, it becomes a part of your body indistinguishable from what you may consider to have been the you deciding to eat anything even if its not edible and even if it is poorly digested, can you really distinguish something you've eaten from yourself? Even a ship or a tree, part of it or the whole thing.

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Lori Drolet

DNA can change your identity.

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cameron taylor

The biggest lie … is the eye! Our “identity” is an artificial construct.. the ‘all seeing eye of Ra(god)’ is the creation of “the self” when one worships god, they are only worshipping the collective ego, which is the reflection in a mirror, and the dark side of the moon … the new church is the cult of personality… that’s what social networks are… the worshipping of ourselves! Just like in this video going through the mind maze of all of the intellectual phases of the ego… and what it means… which is NOTHING! When an “individual” is experiencing the life of themselves through the human body and it’s bodily senses, and in particular the sense of vision/sight, the person never can see how they look like unless they look into our modern glass/mirrors… which means the experiencing they are seeing or viewing is the life of others around them, which is who they are! We are not our bodies… we are what our bodies are experiencing, sensing, doing, touching, consuming.. etc… like the idiom “you are what you eat” means what you are consuming is WHERE and WHO you are….

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User

WTF how bizarre

neurons.

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TheGeneralGrievous19

I agree with Aristotle and Aquinas. Accidents can change but the essence remains. The Substance (essence) is what constitute as as certain beings despite what fluid properties. One can be different but remain the same person. 🌌

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Jones Laging

BAWAL UB CRIM NA MANOOD NETO.

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