HOW TO SPEAK ENGLISH BETTER THAN MOST NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKERS 😃 | Go Natural English - Lake Harding Association

HOW TO SPEAK ENGLISH BETTER THAN MOST NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKERS 😃 | Go Natural English

HOW TO SPEAK ENGLISH BETTER THAN MOST NATIVE ENGLISH SPEAKERS 😃 | Go Natural English

By Micah Moen 100 Comments February 24, 2020


Hello, what is up my naturals, how are you I’m Gabby Wallace your American English teacher Here with another English lesson for you now I just realized I’m sitting on a very creaky chair So if you hear something like that, it’s just the chair. Don’t worry Maybe time for anyone anyway, you’re here because you want to learn how to speak English Naturally more like a native English speaker the interesting thing is that Most native English speakers make so many mistakes all the time when we compared with standard correct English rules so in this lesson I’m actually gonna teach you how to speak English better than most Native English speakers, how about that? Because a lot of native English speakers make mistakes As I mentioned compared with standard correct English, we make mistakes when it comes to grammar structure apostrophes grammar rules even how we use vocabulary and so in this lesson I’m going to share many many many many many many ways that you can actually speak English better than Native English speakers when it comes to grammar rules Okay, so if you’re ready, let’s jump in. Let’s get started Now if you like this kind of English lesson, I want to invite you to take a look at the English fluency formula Which is an e-book that I made for you with all my best tips You can actually get a free sample of it when you click right up there Okay, awesome, so make sure you do that You can check it out and we’re gonna jump into many many many many many many tips. So put on your seat belt Let’s go. We’re gonna go quickly. So one Word that a lot of native English speakers use that actually doesn’t even exist. It’s not even a Standard American English word. It’s eight So when people want to say is not will often say ain’t you may have heard it In fact, there’s a really famous song that I love by Bill Withers. That’s like this ain’t no sunshine when she’s gone Ain’t no sunshine when? She goes away And it means there is no sunshine when she is gone talking about a woman that he loves and There is no sunshine just didn’t work with the melody, right? Or maybe that’s just how he talks so he said ain’t no sunshine when she’s gone and You know, it’s common is it correct? No, but is it common? yes, so we use ain’t to say is not or Do not have like I Got money or I ain’t got time ain’t got time for that. Ain’t nobody got time for that That’s the famous meme you may have seen So ain’t is not correct, but it’s common okay Another thing that a lot of native speakers do is make a double negative. So you heard me just say ain’t No sunshine which Actually, if you think about it would mean that there is sunshine when she’s gone But that’s not what the weather’s just trying to say in this song he’s trying to say that there is no sunshine but ain’t no sunshine is like Negative negative but it’s not like math where negative negative equals a positive it’s Still negative. So if I say I ain’t got no money or I ain’t got no time It still means that I do not have money or I do not have time However, again, it’s not correct, but it’s common. Okay, you may even hear triple negatives Like I ain’t got no money for no one That is super confusing but you know what it still means No money. It’s still negative. Even if it’s a triple or a double negative All right Let’s move on to another very common mistake that native speakers make all the time and in fact, it’s so common that I even hesitate to call it a mistake because at what point does a mistake become correct, if let’s say 90% of people are actually making the mistake. Is it still a mistake? I would love to know your opinion in the comments, but this mistake is was versus worse So for example a correct sentence would be if I were you I would Study English more but most people are gonna say if I was you if I was you I study English more But word is correct in that situation so which should you use in this situation? like when most people are using was it actually depends on the situation you’re in if you’re in a casual situation Then I would probably recommend that you say was if I was you but if you want to sounds more Educated if you are in a professional situation or an academic situation it might be better to go with were and so as I share more of these mistakes, I think this is gonna be an Underlying theme is that you have to learn both ways if you want to be able to fit in wherever you are in any Situation. Okay, let’s move on to whom versus who so Whom is actually dropping out of use it’s not so popular anymore But a correct way of using whom would be like, um to whom did you write that? Love letter or to whom did you send that text? But nobody really talks like that you’re probably gonna say who did you send that text to which is actually another mistake that I Hadn’t even written down to include in this video is ending a sentence in a preposition like – super Not correct another mistake that people often make or native speakers I should say is Saying good instead of well, how you doing? I’m doing good. Thanks. How you doing? well we should actually say well I’m doing well because it’s an Adverb, but I’m doing good is an adjective but people usually say it that way so you have to decide do you want to sound? Correct, or do you want to sounds? normal Mmm something to think about. Okay. So another one is Who versus that? So we already talked about whom versus who let’s talk about Hoover’s is that so the rule is that who is for people and that is for things? but people mix these up all the time we often use that for who instead of who so the lady that Works at the post office is so nice But the correct version would be the lady who works at the post office is so nice So either way I think it’s common but who would be more correct? Because we’re talking about a person next Native-speakers love to forget the subjunctive tense so for example would be really common to hear a sentence like it’s important that he studies a lot for this test, but Actual correct way would be it’s important that he study for the test Subjunctive that’s what a subjunctive is super hard for English speakers When we go to learn another language like Spanish It took me years and years to understand What the subjunctive tense even was because people don’t even really use it anymore in English I mean we do but not that much just like whom or just like Which which which is another example which versus that so which is for non-essential Information that is supposedly for essential information. So for example my a neighbor Which has Three children is very friendly. Um, okay, so I guess that’s not essential information But I said my neighbor that Lives on the left side of my house is very friendly, that would be more Essential information because it kind of describes something Important about that person to be honest. This one’s a little fuzzy It’s a little so-so but I’m gonna tell you one thing people don’t use which as much as that people don’t use who as much as that because that kind of covers a lot of situations and People tend to just want to use the easiest word. You’ll you’ll hear that more often Alright, let’s talk about weather. And if I don’t know whether I should have pizza or tacos for lunch Again, I’m getting hungry you guys always make these videos when I’m hungry I don’t know why but that is the correct usage of weather weather is when you have two or more options But a lot of native speakers would say I don’t know if I should have pizza or tacos For lunch. I mean it’s not Necessarily correct, but it’s really common so weather is for two or more choices If is if you don’t have another choice so I don’t know if I should eat pizza for lunch because I had pizza for dinner last night True story a lot of these examples remind me of when I was learning Spanish and I Had a friend who was a native Spanish speaker And he happened to use this word that I loved all the time he was save aina and by that means like thing, but it’s kind of slang I guess and One day I was in my Spanish class in college and I used this word and the teacher She blew up on me ina is not an appropriate word. That is not even a real word So don’t use it in Spanish class, like wait, how can that be possible? Because my friend he uses the word bind on all the time. And so I just want to sound like a native Spanish speaker So I’m gonna use the word Dinah if you’re a native Spanish speaker, you can tell me in the comments. What do you think? Is it okay to use the word bynum like me who says? Ah Diana I like that thing Is that okay or is that like not a real word? Okay anyway Let’s continue because I have many many more ways that you can speak English Better than a native English speaker when it comes to grammar structure and vocabulary So let’s keep going past verses past Participle. This is a big one native English speakers will often Confuse them or use the past participle When it should be the past tense the simple past tense or vice versa So for example, there’s a skit that I like from key & peele substitute teacher Where the substitute teacher says you done messed up ay-ay ron But you done messed up is not really correct correct would be you have Messed up or you have made a mistake But that’s not how it says in the video That’s not how he does it in the skit but it’s it still makes sense. I mean people understand even though it’s not correct, right? Okay another example A mistake might be people commonly. Say he he’s Drank two beers all readiness only 4:00 p.m people often use especially with this verb to Drink we often use drank instead of drunk because we don’t like using the word drunk in the past participle Because it sounds like to be drunk the adjective and we don’t want to say That it’s weird. But especially with this verb we often just say he’s drank, but it’s not correct So the correct version will be he’s drunk. So he has drunk two beers already Honestly people are not using the Present perfect as much anymore as they’re using the past tense. So if someone wanted to say he has drunk Honestly, they probably just say he drank two beers already and it’s only 4:00 p.m. That’s gonna be more common even Even though the present perfect would be better in the situation when you’re thinking about the rules We’re gonna use the simple past because it’s just easier and we go for easy but that’s why so many English learners have trouble understanding the difference between the simple past and the present perfect because native English speakers are Messing it all up and we’re not Using the present perfect as much as we use the simple past even though we should be using the present perfect But look that’s the way it is. People are commonly Using the simple past more instead of the present perfect Okay, another common mistake might be I should have went to the party not correct I should have gone to the party would be correct Okay, let’s talk about reported speech I’m gonna be super honest and tell you that I have had a problem with reported speech for so long, because Growing up in the United States as a native English speaker I can tell you that people often do not use reported speech the way that you’re supposed to according to proper correct English grammar rules So reported speech is if you’re talking about what somebody else said to you so for example if my friend my friend Sophia says I am Sick, ok. So then if I’m telling you say my friend Sophia said she was Sick, right. So we use the past tense. She said that she was sick and I know this is confusing not only for English learners, but also for me a native English speaker because Honestly people don’t even use this very much anymore. They don’t use it in the correct way. What most people say is? Sofia said she is sick so we would say said – the first verb in the past tense because I Was in the past on the phone with my friend Sofia and she said in the past that she is Sick, or she was sick if I’m gonna say it in the correct way, but she’s still presently sick So that’s why we communicate in the present tense, even though it’s not correct But I’m just telling you this because it’s very common. But again the correct way would be using the past tense for both She said she was sick So confusing though, right? Because if we’re saying was then is she still sick right now? Okay. See see what I mean. It’s confusing English is crazy All right, if you’re in the grocery store and you see those checkout lines where they say ten items or less Those are super common signs, but they are incorrect supermarkets grocery stores, correct yourselves You need to be saying ten items or fewer why because fewer is a word that we use with countable Items one two, three, four, five six seven eight. Nine ten or fewer items, however we often confuse these two words fewer and less so less is actually for Non-count nouns such as sugar could you put a little less sugar in my drink? I don’t like it. So sweet Oh, man, I’m making less money this year than last year so money sugar Non-count nouns uncountable we use less, but we mix these up native speakers. We just we just mess everything up Let’s talk about spelling and apostrophes for a moment We often mess up there as in they are and they’re possessive. This is something I see all Day all the time we often mess up. You are your and the Possessive you’re like your car is awesome The most common mistake is people use the possessive you’re why oh you are for both situations so, you know if you’re sending a text to um someone you like Please don’t write y ou you are Awesome. I’ll be like you’re awesome what your awesome car? This is one that does actually annoy me the other ones that I’ve told you so far I think they’re honestly, okay because they’re really common but when it comes to apostrophes, I’m sorry I am a little bit hardcore I get upset about the apostrophes because they mean different things It’s like you are versus possessive. So don’t tell me in the comments. Why oh, you are beautiful I’ll be like you you learn your apostrophes Okay, I’ll settle down next everyday versus every day, so every day two words Two not four. I’ll choose one of the other two words as two words every day means like Each day, right? So every day I go jogging which is true because I’m training for a 5k Run in about a week, so I need to go jogging Every day so every day as one word is an adjective for example Everyday items that you might find in someone’s kitchen would be a pot a spoon a coffee maker Everyday describes items, right? So we need to know the difference this is kind of a little thing, but it’s a very common mistake Oh back to apostrophes because I’m not done with Apostrophes. There’s something else that really bothers me when people Talk about the day of the week like Sundays and then they put an apostrophe before the S Sundae’s what? sundays on what Sunday’s Sundays Ownership sundays. I I don’t understand Why would you put in ‘ it doesn’t need an apostrophe Sunday does not own anything Okay rant over next people are using the word Actually literally and Like okay the words plural these vocabulary words are being used wrong, but is wrong really wrong when it is so commonly used that’s the thing is that it’s wrong by standard English rules, but are we are we just evolving Devolving. I don’t know but people say actually as kind of a transition word now like Actually, I was thinking We shouldn’t have pizza or tacos for lunch. We should have a hamburger So it’s like an interjection or a transition word now Literally is really overused. But it’s also it’s just become an intensifier like Actually, it’s also used as an intensifier Literally she has a thousand pairs of shoes probably not literally literally really means actually Like exactly exactly so I don’t think she has exactly a thousand pairs of shoes literally is now used to intensify the meaning of your expression but that’s not really the proper usage like is another 100 English teachers and grammar snobs go crazy over the use of Like because we’re using it as an intensifier as a filler as a transition. I Was like instead of I said and then I was like, oh my god I like can’t believe it because like she literally has a thousand pairs of shoes Okay, next me versus I a lot of native speakers will Mix these up for example Me and my friend Sophia or my friends Sophia and me. So me should not be used as a subject it should be I like my friend Sophia and I Me is for a direct object Sophia gave a book to me now This gets super confusing when you start listening to music in English because there’s a popular song by Halsey and gez called him and I And I it’s like why would you put the direct object as a Subject but rappers can do whatever they want. So they Don’t have to play by the rules. Do they so anyway Me should not be a subject bottom line. But if you’re writing a rap song go for it one of my Least favorite to talk about because I don’t follow the correct rule is lay versus lie. So People don’t like to say lie because It sounds like the noun to lie It’s kind of like why we don’t like using the past participle of drunk or to drink which is drunk because it sounds like the adjective like Oh, he’s drunk. So we don’t want to confuse our meaning but we’ve actually started using These verbs incorrectly. So the Common thing that people will say is oh, I’m gonna go lay down I’m gonna go lay down and go to bed or take a nap or whatever. That’s not correct Actually, we’re supposed to use a direct object always with the verb lay like for example I’m going to lay my Phone on my hand So phone is the direct object, but nobody actually uses the for very often I mean probably just say I’m gonna put my phone down on my hand Weird example, I know but happened to have my phone here and I happen to have my hand here. So pretty handy, huh? okay, so we probably just say put instead of lay and Commonly, we would say lie when we’re supposed to say lay. I know it’s really confusing also Lay has another meeting, but we don’t need to get into that So, ah the correct way to use these verbs is to say I’m going to lie down in bed And I’m going to lay The book on the table. That’s correct, but do people actually say that nope Okay quickly. I just have a few more we have further verses farther so we often mix these up Farther is really for specific numbers Like I’m on a road trip like Oh only a hundred miles farther to get to Austin Texas because sometimes I Drive down there to see my friends Further is a little bit more fear. T’v, like I’m going to have to research this this topic further in order to to make a decision affect versus effect People mix these up all the time. It’s actually not that complicated. This one does annoy me the Fact with an a the effect of studying more as you’ll get better the Effect choose no. I just mix them up Cute. Oh my god, then. I just mix these up. I just mix these up to effect is the verb I can’t believe I just made a mistake. This is a great example of how native speakers mess everything up that effect is the noun that the that’s because I’m not seeing them right that effect was an e the effect of studying is you’ll get better to effect with an a the verb is to effect like Making this video I want to affect and help thousands of people, huh? this is difficult you guys this is difficult for his native speakers and finally the Probably top most common mistake I don’t know why I quoted it because I don’t think it’s a mistake because we do it so Commonly, but it really is a mistake No quotation marks about it when we mix up is and are talking about singular and plural Subjects, for example Here’s a lesson. Here’s an English lesson with many many many Tips for you. That’s actually correct because here is an English lesson one English lesson, but if I said here’s Many tips for you, that would be incorrect. Although it’s super common to hear that here is many tips It’s actually incorrect. I should say here are many tips for you. So there you have it there’s Many tips for you. Sorry, but it’s the way it is. So bottom line What is correct and what? Is common are not always the same thing You can actually speak English more correctly than most native speakers if you make these changes If you actually use these points that I just told you correctly if you want to fit in and sound more natural then you may consider using Both the correct way and the most common way depending on your situation If you’re in a more professional situation, I would probably opt for the correct version if you’re taking a test Definitely opt for the correct version. If you’re talking with your friends, then maybe you could use the more common yet Incorrect version. Here’s the thing is do you want to be perfect or do you want to connect with people? Do you want to always use the correct version or do you want to use the common version? I mean Do you ever break the rules in order to do something that makes a little bit more sense? like for example a lot of people in the United States We’ll cross the street Even if they don’t have the green light or the little crosswalk man to cross if they say there’s no one coming Because it just makes sense. If there’s no car coming we can cross the street and it’s safe, right? We don’t have to wait for the rule that says we should wait for the light to cross the street I know this is different in different countries different places but I mean man go to New York City and you’re gonna see people cross the street when they want across the street and they will actually yell at the cars if If the car doesn’t stop for them like hey, I’m walking here. What are you doing? So Roles are funny things, aren’t they? So tell me in the comments What do you think is the best decision is it better for you personally to? Use the correct version or do you think it’s better for you to use the more common version of these points in English? I’m waiting for your response I’m always here to help you with English learning so that you can learn the correct way And also the most natural way, so thank you so much for watching again If you’d like to learn all my best tips in one awesome resource Grab your free sample of the English fluency formula right over there. You can subscribe if you haven’t already What are you doing? Subscribe by clicking over right down there or you can watch another video click right down there to see the last one that came out Last week I will see you again soon in the next lesson here at go natural English I love you guys. Mwah. Bye for now

100 Comments found

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Rey Guerrero

«Vaina» a veces significa acerca de algo que de lo cual no sabes mucho, o algo que no sabes definir como tal, también significa «cosa» pero para mí cuando lo usan en el segundo significado suena feo, y en el primer significado suena bien… «me gusta esa vaina» suena feo en mi opinión… Saludos desde Colombia

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Rey Guerrero

«Your» so fun hahahaha

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Ammar Muhammad

Thanks for your essential videos Gabby,merely I find them comprehensible and helpful.more and more of its kind.

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David Reyes

Vaina jajaja. It have a mexican meaning (is a thing), different from the Spanish (a case). If you want sound like a mexican farmer, use it lol.

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Jorge Rios

I love when you said so so

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Marcel Perera

You are awesome I Love you and I Love your lesson

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Joan Ramírez

La palabra "vaina" únicamente la utilizan los colombianos, en ningún otro país hispanohablante se utiliza, yo soy de México.

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ERI-K BURI

Greetings Gabby:
"Vaina" is an inappropriate word in the Spanish formal to say: "stuff" because it does part of the regionalism slang. Really ot sounds ugly. "Vaina" in Spanish has a different meaning. It is the seed cover or that covers a sword. Thank you and blesses.

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Ninosinamor19

You have a beautiful eyes.

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Josh Whitaker

I just built Convose, a platform to find an instant practice conversation about any topic.

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Rahmatillo Ergashov

Yeah youʼre best teacher and beautiful.

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Silva Netto

Very nice video Gabby!

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Farris Ikrimah

Am terribly surprised when I hear Americans use double negative, it really exasperates me internally to the point of hating american English

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Patricia Azevedo

Tank you so much

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Mithun Das

I want to learn english to you madam

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Randor Guerrero

You sound great " me gusta esa vaina"

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English Grammar By Abdul Wahid Azmi

Ma'am this really I like you and your speech

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Noura M

OMG i think i'm gonna cry now !! you make is and was situation clear for me i was confused about them and ahhhhh MANY THANKS GABBY ..kisses

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Abdelfatah Abdelfatah

Give me your Facebook

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lil jakepaul Clistenes

Did you studied Spanish in the Dominican Republic?

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Roman Zhuravlev

Thank you Gabby/ You are very beatiful women.

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Alamsyah

i like you very much, make me better to learn english and your voice very clear easy to me to understand, thx alot

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a Positive person

😊❤ gabby love u so much

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Janey יהוה Avendaño יהוה

Hello miss I always see your videos I feel they help me a lot are you so pretty maybe like my best girl.. whatever you make always think in this words, too genuine.

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Luiz Jr

Those eyes

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Дмитрий Аграновский

Thank you from Russia! Спасибо из России! 🙂

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Sally Tembo

It's not so bad. I love the lesson thanks a bunch for your knowledge with us. We really appreciate very useful.

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H Y

Need to watch this 100 times to master…

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renata oliveira

Thanks 😍

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Obenson Justin

Thank you Ms!

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Pedro Ferreira

Excellent video!

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Daniel muñoz

Thanks. You are a great teacher. Vaina is used in some south American countries like Colombia and it means: What a problem! And it's very informal XD

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Triana dewi

I really like watching your video because i can hear your voice clearly, and i have question for you, can you explain when we use think, guess, and thought.because im still confuse about that

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Lidia M. Páramo

Hi Gabby! I'm Spanish, and about the word "vaina", it's most used in Latin America. But what I think is why not to used in a spanish class? I know it's not to much apropiate use it, but I think lenguage teachers should relax and no to be so polite, don't you? Love your channel, you're a amazing English teacher! 😉

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Dato Bakuradze

I prefer to learn correct ones.P.S I really enjoy your videos, it's very interesting, thank you sooo much

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Hriday Konai

Mam you are the best native speaker in my knowledge ..many many thank to you mam ..

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JUANJ Moreno

9800

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Antonio Dachey

I think vaina is a colombians slang

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Anil Nasah

You are great but we don't need to hear Spanish words in an English session.

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Vladimir LB

"Vaina" is more like: Stuff. Or something like that. I think so.

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Freddy Rijo

Hola si es correcto usar vaina yo lo uso normalmente porque soy español y puedo entender por vaina Qué significa muchas cosas puede ser cualquier cosa gracias Espero que vea esto y soy uno de tus fan número uno

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Bishal Sangpang

Thanks

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Cerenade Me

19:30 – Native English speaking person here of a looooong time – YES!!! That drives me nuts! (Or should I say, it drives me nut's! hahaha) 😉

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Edward Rodriguez

Vaina = Sheat : The envelope of some seeds.
In Colombia also use us this word to name anything.
Example: The grinder is dangerous/ esa vaina es peligrosa!

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Octavio Batista

I’m wondering why we use at instead of in or of ???

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angel nocturno joan

😍😍😍😍😘😘😘😘😘

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Anderson 100

I'm going to the beach today even though it's raining.😎☔

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kidus feleke

nice English Lecturers

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GABRIEL GREGORY

29:00 that's true

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narendra bk

It would have been better if there was given subtitles of lesson.

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narendra bk

The peoples who are not native speaker need subtitle to understand english.

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SAAD RAMADHAN MUHI

Thank you so much

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Domenico Romano

i love you

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CHILDERICO ALENCASTRO F. DE CARVALHO

You looked beautiful with this hair.

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Jailton Girão da Silva

Em português nós dizemos :
Eu NÃO tenho dinheiro NÃO.
Eu NÃO tenho NENHUM dinheiro.

Duas palavras negativas na mesma frase.Em português não está errado

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Alexandro Rodrigues Pinheiro

As you said at moment 26:14, your videos are really affecting and helping us to became us fluently speaking English. Thank you very much!! I am Brazilian, I live in Rio de Janeiro.

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Jab

If natives are messing it up all the time, then why us students are we learning grammar rules that makes you sound like a robot?

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Jorge Crespo

"Vaina" is a colloquial term. It is only used in certain countries. Not all spanish speaking countries use the same words for the same things.

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Michel Beauloye

Hello Gaby! I am sorry, but I still do not understand the difference between "every day" and "everyday", although I get the difference between "something" and "some thing", "some body" and "somebody". Would you please explain this once more, if possible? Thank you and … have a nice day.

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Damon

How do you speak an apostrophe?

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Jonathan Chacon

Vaina, how you said is right, it´s correct, but indeed isn´t a real world "in that context". Because "vaina" literaly means the shell that covers legumins.

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Ricardo Morlas Peguero

GABBY: ALMOST EVERY NATIVE THAN SPEAK ANY LANGUAGE HAVE SOMETHING WRONG WHEN IS TALKING THEIR LANGUAGE.

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Leonardo Reis Santiago

11:00 – baina means "but" in basque. Does your native Spanish Speaker was from Basque Country? Basque Country is in Spain baina they are not Spanish

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Rogan Bryan

Ain’t is a grammatically correct contraction of Am not . Amn’t does not trip easily off the tongue,so it’s easier to contract it further and to to use Ain’t.
In any other context it is wrong to say Ain’t.
I’m a native speaker of British English and I completely disagree with your suggestion that people should choose to speak English badly in any circumstances.
In the UK people are judged more by their accent and use of good or bad English than by almost any other criterion

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Walter Weimer

I never knew when or whether to use plural or singular with "people"

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Anael Pujols Sanchez

hi thanks so much for your help. and the word baina is a pretty use word and sound awesome and naturally , I'm from dominican Replublic and I think the guy that you lerned it as well so. no waorries for the other.

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Fernando Fonseca

To whom this video may concern. It concerns me. hehehehe. Hope I am correct, grammatically .

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Fernando Fonseca

I commute to and from work everyday by bicycle.

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Gary Martin

Were is the subjunctive conjugation of "to be", as opposed to was. It is used in a hypothetical, wish or command. Example: "If I were a carpenter, and you were a lady…." It's imaginary because I'm not a carpenter. However, I think you are quite a lady !

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Gary Martin

Great work, Gabby, keep it coming !  

What Gabby is irritated about is indicative  of the dumbing down of America. Little speaks more loudly about one's  education and even  character than  speech and writing. Knowing and following the language rules tends to show intelligence, caring  and attention to detail. It doesn't help that the US has sustained massive immigration in the last 30 years and many immigrants never bother to learn proper English. Also the rise and acceptance of Ebonics has also standardized much  nonconforming usage. The word "ain't" exists in large part  because there is no  contraction for "am not" — so ain't was invented to cover this case.  The verb form  "am" itself is becoming less and less popular. The accent, slurring and poor usage of southerners has driven Yankees crazy for years but it is  hundreds of years in the making and isn't going away. It is an integral part of Southern charm — and as a southerner myself, I ain't lying 'bout that!"To be fair, English is a difficult language because so many words and usages are context sensitive or follow irregular rules. For example, what purpose does "whom" really serve? Yes,  it is the referent for the  object and not the subject, but does anyone really cue in on that context? Does it add anything to the meaning? Some changes are creeping in to reduce irregularities like "to gift" as a verb rather than "to give". It drives me nuts to hear it  but if you think about it, it does make sense as the noun and verb  are the same, as is the noun "run" and the verb "run". Another example is  "conversate" as opposed to the verb converse. I had never heard that form until about a year ago and then it occurred several times. At first I thought it was bad usage like "to gift" but I looked it up…. and it IS a valid word in the dictionary. In fact, it
is at least two hundred years old so I had to give in and accept it as correct.
These examples show a regularization of rules which make English easier to learn and speak. It used to be (back in the day!) that a college graduate was expected to know how to speak and write nearly perfect English. But no more. Now almost anything goes. But I suggest that everyone learn and use correct rules when writing something to be read by anyone outside of one's  casual contacts. All business correspondence, including emails, should conform to fairly good rules.Things like word choice, punctuation and other usage rules covered in these videos should be observed as you may well be judged on the quality of your communication. It follows that if you write good English you should speak it too because  not only will you be judged on that but it makes it easier to write like you speak.
There are a couple of really good examples in art which illustrate how speech matters. Namely the play  "Pygmalion" by English author George Bernard Shaw which was made into two different movies, the latest of which was a musical  in the mid  1960's and also a Broadway play with Rex Harrison and Audrey Hepburn.The movie "The King's Speech" is a good example too, although the King knew the rules quite well (as it was the King's English!), he stuttered badly. The King knew that he needed to appear completely kingly to his subjects in a time of great distress and needed to sound better to be taken seriously  It is based on the true story of Queen Elizabeth's father.

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Machirolo Hjmz

¡I love the way you teach English !

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Mel Flo

Two wrongs do not make one right.
Let’s speak English correctly.

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李大卫

from China I support you

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Inam Mani

I thinks if I know you and we get in love each other my English definitely will improved beyond reality

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ali dahir

Gabby how can I get you. I am very loving you

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dhamendra dhamendra ganguly

LUSCIOUS KYA HAI

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welat kurdîstane

GAPI I think better solution to marry you and off course you well teach me very well and I ll pay money what you need thanks

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Elier Cervantes

Thank you for the lesson, very helpful 😉👍

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jesus rico

Vaina is a Colombian word I think it is real Oooooh yeah!!😀😀😀😀😀😀✌✌✌✌

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nimco qaran

Thanks a lot dia teacher

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Fausto Ramirez Cortés

It is definitely a slang and it comes from Venezuela, Colombia and other countries. Every country has its own slangs.

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Y U

Hi, Gabby: in the waether for me you can eat a hot food

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Y U

Hi Gabby:

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Lyubov Strauss

Use correct version

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Alberto Balmori

Am native e Spanish speaker and “vaina” doesn’t exist. Don’t use vaina

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Alberto Balmori

I think we have to talk on the correct way , native or not, English or other language, we have to speak correct.

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luis otavio

Essa moça é a mais bonita do youtube, ainda por cima ensina verygood!!

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Сергей Блаунштейн

This woman all better and better with everyone time

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DARCLEY ALKAIM

Hey, Gabby, the word "vania" has two meanings; the "sheath" of sword or a"pod" of vanilla. At least, these are explained in the dictionary. I hope I could help you. By the way, your videos are excellent.

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mauro Méndez reyes

I'm learning english. Me gusta esta baina..🤣🤣😂😂

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Jefferson Mora

Me gusta esa Vaina!! very good pronunciation

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Alexandre Martins

Great your classes! I´ve been following you on Instagram here on youtube. You are one of the best english teachers I´ve ever seen online. Thank you for helping us to improve our english skills. Alexandre from Brazil….

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Mtst

Que vaina que una profesora con esos ojos tan bonitos este muy lejos de mi país, thanks for you help, teacher!

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javier Hernández

Puedes utilizar esa palabra (vaina) aunque en algunos países latinoamericanos no te van a entender.

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carlos salinas

You so pretty.very nice smile and i love you're hair.

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Andrea Callejas

If you live in Venezuela maybe vaina is ok but you want to sound correct in Spanish I advice you not use it

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Jeremias machava

Hy my educator. I speak portuguese as my second language. But because of you, I became English speaker. Please I need to become more neutral.

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Tartaruga

Love

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Nik Angel Wisa Pillaca

Jajaja "VAINA" is very informal!!! However se use it just when we are with close friends…

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Ivana Jurić

For example:

"I don't know nothing."
There are two negatives and that will be positive that I know everything.

"I don't know anything."
That example is that I actually don't know.

Is it correct teacher?

Thank you.☺

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