Every Minute Counts: Emergency Response Planning in Forestry - Lake Harding Association

Every Minute Counts: Emergency Response Planning in Forestry

Every Minute Counts: Emergency Response Planning in Forestry

By Micah Moen 22 Comments November 20, 2019


[Radio chatter] Go for first aid. This is Derik with the excavator. Scott fell
on his way up to see me. It’s pretty bad. His leg’s messed up and he
hit his head. Is he talking? Is he bleeding? Is there anyone
else there? He’s talking, but it’s just us two—I don’t
know what to do. I can’t get him down the hill. His leg’s just—he
can’t walk. Okay, keep calm, don’t move him. Where are
you? We’re at, uh—I don’t know. What block is
this? 31? 132? I don’t know. We’re right up the main road, just past the
fork by the 17 km mark. Which block? I don’t know! The block right after the fork.
It’s right off the main line, right by the beaver pond. The lake? The lake, the pond, whatever, yeah! Okay, I got it. Keep him warm and comfortable,
and don’t let him move or fall asleep. The ETV’s close by; I should be there in
10 or 15. Scott’s always on us about knowing our exact
location. I just couldn’t remember at the time. And the fact that Scott didn’t know—that worried
me. He was kinda out of it. When an injury occurs, really anywhere in
the bush, they teach you there’s a 60-minute window to get someone to the hospital after
an injury: the golden hour. I’ve seen a lot of different situations as
a first aider … most of them pretty basic. We’ve got Scott halfway up. We’re going to
need the stretcher. Let’s do it. When I got to the block, I didn’t realize
how different this one was going to be. I was relieved to see Harry and the guys come
up that hill. They couldn’t get there fast enough. It took
them forever to get through that slash. I was like “Come on, man, let’s go—we’ve
got to get him out of here!” Scott, it’s Harry from first aid. Don’t move,
okay? Okay, what I need you to do is take a deep breath
for me, all right? Okay, left ankle or right ankle? Left ankle, okay. Listen bud, we’re going to get you out of
here—Scotty! Derik, we’re going to need our exact location,
do you have it in the machine? Yeah. Okay, what I want you to do is call Rich, the super from the other site, tell him we need a helicopter right now. Go! What are you doing? We’re going to bandage his head, aren’t we? Just put that down! No, no, no, don’t move him. We’re not going
to move him. Rich, this is Der … My supervisor’s hurt
… First aid … Harry… Did you say someone’s hurt? Scott’s hurt! He was coming up to me and he
fell on block … 236. Harry’s here and we need a helicopter ASAP. Okay, 236, got it. What’s Scott’s condition? He’s unconscious, he fell! When I got the call I went straight for the
emergency response plan. Well the sat phone’s battery had power, which
was good because I don’t use it much. But I couldn’t get a signal where I was. Scott was coming in and out of consciousness,
which was freaky. Okay, everybody grab a corner. We’re going
to go slow and steady; watch your footing, okay? We knew we needed to get him out of there. Ready and … up. Our ERP is pretty good—at least I think
it is. We have all the pieces. But when Derik told me it was Scott … that
was unnerving. Normally he takes care of our safety stuff. Nobody considered he might be the one we’d have to look after. [Ringing] Coastal Transport, how can I help you? This is Rich Johnson of ForTech Logging. We’ve
had an accident and we need a helivac. I’m sorry, Mr. Johnson, we’re all socked in
here. Nobody’s flying in or out until the weather clears, and I don’t have an ETA on when that could be. Well it’s all clear here; is anyone flying? No, no one’s flying. You’re going to have to call ground transport. Do you have a number for the ambulance? Yeah, I got it. It’s one thing to climb the block by yourself… It’s another to carry a 200-something-pound guy down in a stretcher. That was ridiculously tough. Not getting the helicopter was huge. Now calling an ambulance and getting them up here—that was going to be tricky and it was going to take a lot more time. BC Ambulance, for what city please? I’m 25 km north of Harrison on a logging road. What’s the address of the emergency? There isn’t an address, we’re in the bush!
I can give you the directions to the location. Okay, go ahead. Take highway 44 north… Well they kept asking questions I didn’t know
how to answer. So I realized it was going to be easier to
just meet the ambulance and lead them in myself. Easy… Argh, this is crazy! I can’t see anything! Come in, Harry. Okay, okay, put him down. Gentle… It’s Harry, what’s up? Yeah, the helicopter can’t fly. Seriously? Yeah, I need you to package Scott up in the
ETV and meet us at the junction beside the swamp. Okay, we’ll do our best. What swamp? The swamp! The one with the beaver dam for
cryin’ out loud! The lake? Sure, the lake. There’s a wide spot there
we can rendezvous with the ambulance. Okay, got to go. Let’s go! You know, I tell the guys we have to practice
this stuff… You can’t just take the ERP from one site
and move it to the other. Things change; there’s different workers,
equipment, access. Every site’s different. I just wanted to get there as quick as possible
and meet the ambulance. I was probably driving too fast. Okay, who’s driving? Aren’t you? I’ve got to stay in the back with Scott. Can
you drive this? Yeah, I’ll drive it, yeah! Okay do it! Okay. Now! Okay. At that point, we were just praying that Scott
would be okay. I mean … Nobody wants to see this happen. I got to the spot pretty fast. But waiting
for the ambulance… I realized they might be at the other turnout. So I raced down the road and they’d been waiting
for 15 minutes. We’re right where you said. Where are you
guys? You think you have your safety procedures
down, but it never goes the way you think. It takes so long to get help in the bush,
every minute counts. [Sirens] You hear a lot about the so-called golden
hour and you think that’s going to be plenty of time. Evacuations aren’t easy. Everybody thinks “Just call a helicopter and
everything will be okay.” But that’s not how it works. We followed our ERP … We should’ve practiced. Getting Scott out took way too long. Don’t wait for an emergency to find out if
your plan will work. Know your plan and practice it.

22 Comments found

User

WNY Trash Trucks

what happened to him

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User

insrtclevrnamehere

another great video, very informative!

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User

Wouter d.B.

From forestry I know that sawing trees ain't that hard, it's walking on that damn uneven surface that really wears you down.

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User

djsatane

Is this based on real event?

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User

craig dundas

that's what he gets for not trAining his crew! I hold training and emergency response drills a lot with my crews that way we're all on the same page when it's time to attend an emergency! notice no one checked to make sure the scene was safe too!

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User

09speedfreak

This was a very good video. You guys should make more videos like this one on a different subject.

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User

Thomas Yamaguchi

That info is so vital, thank you all !

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User

Petra S

Good actors

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User

Ae.Raven

Emergency plan has some bad bureaucracy. Going through a pile of books to find emergency privatized vehicle numbers and having to skim and scan through a cluttered sheet of paper to find the number? No thanks, i'll just make sure I get the correct location from someone and dial 911.

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User

Remember The Slap Films

If Scott had been waring his helmet maybe he would have made it. He was "On his way up to see me when he fell and hit his head – " which leads me to think he had removed his helmet as he was hiking, not cutting.

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User

LectronCircuits

Grim scenario, brilliantly acted. Cheers!

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User

Subbura 1988

This is going diff BC

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User

Scott W.

"It took too long…" the assumption would be that he either lost his life or limb.

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User

Ob Fuscated

If you get GPS signal at your location (CHECK, don't assume) small hiking GPS are very light and could pinpoint locations for responders. They weigh very little compared to a radio.

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User

Ob Fuscated

Also when you speak on radio, speak CLEARLY from the diaphragm. You should sound as clear and precise as a military drill instructor. Most people don't know why military commands are spoken that way. Their normal speech is sloppy which isn't worth a damn if your radio or phone is breaking up.

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User

Ob Fuscated

Maps should be grid maps with coordinates. LandNav is old news and easy to learn. Kids learn in scouting. Pardon the multiple posts but I was interrupted and had to leave my workstation.

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User

Nathan Arievlis

All those actors in the bush…What were they thinking? They all could've been injured or worse.

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User

James Stimpson

This is why I always carry a helicopter in the back of the van.

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User

Dennis Evans

It would have been nice to see a soft splint on that leg.

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User

Darrel Baillie

This was a good video to teach why it is important to practice emergency drills. Most people see emergency drills as a waste of time and money- this scenario paints a very different picture. And proper planning and communication is essential.

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User

Busch Wacker

Can't here a damn thing ­čÖë

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User

Mario Lisa

Soo…did the guy survive was he permanently injured? What happened?

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