Climate change up close and personal: How Chennai ran out of water - Lake Harding Association

Climate change up close and personal: How Chennai ran out of water

Climate change up close and personal: How Chennai ran out of water

By Micah Moen 32 Comments September 22, 2019


One of the first obvious signs
of climate change in the world is that there is a town in India
with ten million inhabitants that ran out of water. Of course, that doesn’t mean that
dehydrated people are collapsing in the streets, however, if you take a look around, you can see clear signs of
the hardships this city is facing. Chennai is
the sixth largest city of India. Its population is equal
to that of Hungary: Nearly ten million people live here. This was the first city in the world
to reach Day Zero, the point when water depletes, taps and wells run dry, and people have to stand in line
at water distribution points. Ever since mid-summer,
water had been brought to Chennai by train and by trucks
from other parts of India. But don’t think of this as a problem
that is specific to India. Due to climate change and human activity, this threat hangs over
several other cities worldwide. We travelled to the capital
of Southern India to personally experience
the effects of climate change, and to see if there are any methods that offer protection
against a catastrophe. We could spot the effects of water depletion as soon as we arrived. For example, you can see these
water supply trucks everywhere. Availability of water depends on them
in the whole city. Here is one, but right next to it, you can find another. We are in one of the poor
neighbourhoods of Chennai, People living here are out on the streets
waiting for these water trucks at dawn. The trucks arrive
one after the other, there are three of them here now, and when one runs out, people move on to the next one. We’re spending much time
on the water, because we don’t all get
proper water. More, and each and every day,
more and more people are suffering Some family members
have to stay at home all day to watch for water trucks, so they can run and refill
their containers with water. Going to work becomes
rather difficult like that. -You come here every day for water? -You come here every day for water?
– Every day! There is a civil crisis now. I have not seen
such a drought in my life. I am 70 years old. If we take the last ten years, the extreme events
are increasing. We are getting a smaller number
of rainy days, Two years back, we had normal water, an we had normal… When you opened your tap,
the water would be coming. We had piped
water supply. That stopped about
five months back. But then, we had our own
wells and bore wells which have ground water. Right? So we started
depending on them. But that also went
down, and down, and down. My open well is dry.
There is no water. What became apparent in Chennai is that
the water crisis is more than a lack of water. We saw that in the poorest neighborhoods, where, next to the polluted river, there is a dam built out of garbage
on which we are walking, with the miserable huts
on the other side of the dam. This neighbourhood is sometimes
tormented by droughts, and at other times,
they have the flooding river to worry about, as it tends to submerge the houses
on the lower parts. In November and October,
the rain is coming and that’s a very bad problem. Floodwater comes in. And you put the water here? We pay money for the water,
for it to get into our homes. The rich can afford,
but the poor cannot afford. The government also
supplies water for free to the poor people. – Is it free? – Is it free?
– Yeah, free. Each house will get
five quarts of water. In the morning, five quarts,
in the evening, another five quarts. So all in all, 150 litres
is what they get. – When you bring this water, where do you put it? – When you bring this water, where do you put it?
– The sump. We have made a sump
over there, we will pour there,
and then we will shift it to the back. – And then it…
– It comes in the tap. The water is going in there Can I see? These colourful jugs have become
symbols of this crisis, locals use them to bring water
and fill the larger containers in their homes. That is my sister living there,
and my whole family. OK, how many people? Eight. Eight to ten people. But how much exactly is this
150 litres of water that families in India
have to share each day? This is equivalent to a single person’s
daily water consumption in Hungary. But this crisis is not only
a problem for the poor, the middle class suffers
just the same. There are several restrictions. Like the people living here, right? They get up early in the morning,
at six or seven, they open the tap to get water, or else, if they sleep through that,
that day there is no water for us. So, not more than 2 or 3 buckets,
it’s enough for us to wash our clothes, we wash our clothes
every two days once, and I used to take
baths daily, so… It would take us around four,
that’s it. I would say the lower,
plus middle class people are more affected by this water crisis. I’m a middle-class man,
so I feel that. Behind me, you can see how restaurants
get their water supply. These large trucks are deliviering it, and they pump water in there
through a tube. They told me that their profits
took a huge hit too, as restaurants have to spend
a lot of money on water, which used to be
a cheap commodity. Besides the businesses,
the rich are also buying water, as they don’t have the time or
simply can’t be bothered to stand in line. Now, you know, there are a lot of these
residences, apartment complexes, and houses with people who don’t have
adequate water supply because of the crisis. Everybody is kind of forced to buy this,
depending on their requirements. It may be once in five days,
once in ten days, once in two days, but if you have, let’s say,
four people in your house, in twelve days, the maximum is about
twenty or twenty-five dollars. For twelve days. But the rich and the poor
are equal in one regard: Tapwater was never
potable in India, so drinking water was always
something everybody had to buy. Drinking water.
20 litres. 20 litres per one. There is a plot of ten houses
where I deliver like this. For drinking and cooking, they buy these cans. But for the common man, both rich and the poor, we need water for bathing,
washing clothes, washing the floor, that is not relevant. We’re going to the reservoirs at edge of town
with someone from the Rain Centre, we’ll take a look at where
Chennai used to get its water from, and see the condition
of these places now. As I grew up in the city,
I found a lot of independent houses with a lot of sidespace,
and gardens, and trees, and everything, these slowly gave way to
huge apartment complexes, therefore they started filling up the lakes, and then they converted them
into plots. The expansion of the city and
conserving the water bodies of the city, these are conflicting objectives. You can best see the roots of this problem
at the outskirts of the city, these giant blocks of flats
built to support the ever-growing population. The great irony of this place is that one of the wells used by water trucks
to refill their containers is right next to these tenements. Then the trucks go and sell
the water taken from here in places where there is
no drinking water precisely because of the residential buildings
built over the former reservoirs. The migration level is beyond
the availability of water. That’s the main reason
for the overpopulation and the water problem. The population was 5 million
ten years back, by now, it almost doubled,
but the water supply remained the same. Supply comes from the heavens, through rain. We have several water bodies
across Chennai, where rainwater
was collected. But they have not been cleaned
for several years, There are a lot of encroachments,
people dumping solid waste into it, and these water bodies
have to be recovered. This is one of the biggest lakes
from which the city of Chennai gets its water. It’s never this dry. This pretty green landscape behind me
is actually the Chembarambakkam Lake, which would be Chennai’s largest lake
if it weren’t completely dry. Standing here on a normal day,
the water would reach over my head, but now I can walk around
without my feet getting wet. But otherwise, this entire lake is full, you know? The government is the biggest
encroacher in Tamil Nadu, they do abuse their power, and they do encroach on
water bodies a lot. So that is a big issue for us. Prashant is the leader of an
anti-corruption NGO, and he told us about the connections
between the water crisis and corruption. There is a lot of money being spent on
the restoration of water bodies, But when you go to the site… …we don’t see work being done. The lakes are not being
desilted properly, so the question about
what is happening to all this money, is a big question. So, the blame for this water crisis
does not solely fall on climate change. A population boom, corruption,
and mismanagement of water supplies all contributed to this
brutal problem. We are getting
fewer rainy days. That, in itself, is kind of
an indicator of climate change. So is it like a global… …Global phenomenon. And local factors are also contributing
to the global phenomena. Last year, monsoon. It was a failure. So that is why
we are now suffering. We are getting fewer rainy days,
and there is a decline in monsoon rain. We could finetune our systems to be better, We could have some adaptation measures to cope with these situations. The keyword is: The keyword is:
Rainwater harvesting. I will show you what
harvesting is all about. We have a huge tank here, which we call a ‘sump.’ – What can this be used for? – Anything! Everything! – Even for drinking? – Even for drinking?
– Yes! One thing is the groundwater storage, and the second is the green cover. So, both should be taken care of well to deal with the challenges of
climate change and urbanisation. The future droughts
are going to be more severe. We will be facing
much more severe crises in the future. The more houses are being built up, the demand increases, right? Which means we have to be
more sincere in collecting rainwater. But people don’t do that! There is an anger
when there is a drought. There is an anger
when there is a flood. But when there is nothing,
people forget about it. That’s the nature of people. We forget.

32 Comments found

User

TravelHunter

Elképesztő és amíg nem tapasztaljuk meg, addig tényleg elsétálunk mellette. Ahogy mondjana faszi a videóban, ilyen az emberi természet. De az is biztos, hogy mi jobban meg fogjuk szívni a nélkülözést, mint ezek az emberek, akik. alapból mostoha körülmények között élnek

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User

DJ Wologda

Európában is nem sokára ilyen lesz.

Reply
User

attila antal

ha tarlós nyer, nálunk is ez lesz pár hónap múlva, szörnyű – szörnyű

Reply
User

Bushido Gengster

Na tessek!
Ha furodnenek is minden nap akkor mi lenne?

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User

Bushido Gengster

Ezert jon ide a sok migrans.
Kell a vizunk.
Olmot nekik!

Reply
User

Tarka BMX

klimavaltozas nem letezik…
ez egy termeszetes jelenseg

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User

RS-TV

A videoban elmondja, hogy azert nincs viz mert a viztarozokat feltoltottek es tarsashazakat epitettek ra, magyaran a globalizacio miatt nincs vizuk. Ma mar egy klimakatasztrofa cimmel barmit el lehet adni.

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User

Péter Varga

2:03 jahh igen ezért nem dolgozik többségük🤨😂😂

Reply
User

Alkot Alkotman

Világunk jelenlegi formájában megszűnik létezni!

Reply
User

Horváth Sándor

Egy magyar felirat fájt volna?

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User

Pal Tomori

Talán nem kellene ennyi gyereket szülniük…

Reply
User

Gyula Blaho

Ezt a retket, amiben ezek élnek….!?

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User

regnum marianum

Nem hiszem hogy elfogyott, csak elzárták a víztakarékosság jegyében.

Reply
User

Szereljük meg

Milyen rohadt igényesek ezek az emberek, a marha az utcára szarik a városban, minden képen egy halom szemét……. Akkora a vízhiány, hogy a felét mellélocsolja miközben tölti…..

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User

Dj calippo

Ha nem szaporodnának a normál érték tízszeresére akkor talán nem lenne ez, szerintem ez nem a klímaváltozásnak tudható be.

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User

Dr. Dubai

Túl sok ember van már a Földön, főleg Ázsiában és Afrikában vannak nagyon sokan. Ha ilyen ütemben folytatódik a populáció növekedése, súlyos problémák lesznek. Háború, éhínség, vízhiány, szárazság. A Föld már nem képes ennyi embert eltartani. Teljesen feléli az emberiség ezt a gyönyörű bolygót.

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User

Gellért 95

Talàn ha nem szennyeznèk szarrà a sajàt folyóikat, akkor lenne vizük. Igènytelen nèpsèg s ez làtszik is rajtuk, a vàrosukon. Ide kellene hazamenjenek az európai honfitàrsaik is. ^^

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User

mateo ito

Del india fovarosa Bengaluru , nem Chennai

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User

Zsombor Erdész

ilyenkor eszembe jut, hogy a műanyag mentes július, húsmentes akármicsoda meg autómentes napok semmit se érnek egész Európában, amíg egy országban háromszor annyian élnek szemétben, környezettudatosság (majdnem) teljes hiányában. Valamint a itthoni napi 150 liter/fő vízfogyasztás statisztikát is kérdésesnek tartom.

Reply
User

Voldemort

Tiszta udva rendes ház.

Reply
User

DittyCat79

Ez inkább túlnépesedésndk tűnik, nem annyira klímakatasztrófának.

Reply
User

dulkrisz

Pontosan ezek miatt van klima katasztrofa….

Reply
User

Zwack86

Most komolyan 1 magyar riportban az angol szöveg angolul van feliratozva? Valaki ezt megmagyarázná…. Hol a magyar felírat?

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User

László Herczeg

Egy városnév amit sose hallottam és annyian laknak benne mint egész Magyarországon. Tele szeméttel az egész már vizük sincs. Szörnyű. Pokol a földön

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User

ZCD 696

Milyen ironikus helyzet.A bolygonk 71%-at viz boritja, es megis viz hiany van egyes helyeken.

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User

Wyler Elisabeth

Ami meg volt is édes víz Indiában, azok felszínét amúgy sem lehetett látni sosem, mert a gyors folyású folyóik legtöbbjén ipari hulladék és szemét zúdul le hosszú kiló métereken át. Indiát nem lehet sajnálni, a világ első számú környezet szennyező forrása, én se innám meg azt a vizet amibe beleszartam. Megérdemlik amiért ennyire felelőtlenül nemzik a gyermekeiket és túlnépesedést generálnak, az a nép megérett a pusztulásra. Csak ne kezdjenek el vándorolgatni Európa szerte, éljenek a saját mocskukban amit elő teremtettek maguknak.

Reply
User

Rmx Ficsi

Legalább üzemanyaguk van.

Reply
User

Christian Schmidt

150 liter vizet használ egy magyar naponta? Akkor vagy én vagyok rendkívül takarékos, vagy nem vagyok Magyar…

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User

netmobil netmobil

Hazudtok , es hazudtok again:) Klima valtozas? Ember 5 millarol 10 re nott a lakosok szama azt mondta a szakerto! a vizgyujtoteruletre hazakat epitettek!!! es te klima katasztrofarol dumalsz! Na es a vege korupcio! Nevetseges mit muveltek! Csak a debil nem latja mit manipulaltok!

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User

József Tomkó

Ez nem a klimaváltozás, ez a túlnépesedls

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User

Elek Mekk

Itt már csak egy kiadós szönyegbombázás segítene.

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User

Petrovics Dániel

A kommentek
90%-a: Indiában utcákon sz*rnak
5%-a: nem is a globális felmelegedés miatt van az egész hanem túlnépesedés miatt
Maradék 5% valami shitpost mint az enyém

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