Are You Listening? Ep. 2 | Your Listening Environment - Lake Harding Association

Are You Listening? Ep. 2 | Your Listening Environment

Are You Listening? Ep. 2 | Your Listening Environment

By Micah Moen 100 Comments October 7, 2019


Welcome to another episode of Are You Listening? Today we’re going to talk a little bit about
how you listen what you listen to and your environment. Please look at the iZotope website to find
companion blogs videos other educational materials and today I want today spend a little time
talking about your environment and how to set it up and some strategies for setting
it up because ultimately what you hear is what matters most. So we’re looking to develop are brains and
tune our brains to what the stimulus is right? What you’re listening to. Which means you got to pay attention to the
setup. So I’m going to call this next section you
can’t hear the truth through rose-colored glasses. I mixing metaphors here right but you got
to get the point, if there’s something about your listening environment that either enhances
what you hear in a way that somehow hides the truth or it filters out some information
and doesn’t allow you to hear everything that’s present in your track mastering you’re going
to have problems. You’re going to be surprised. Either what you’re doing isn’t going to translate
well out into the world or and this is kind of a sneaky thing to happens sometimes your
processors compressors especially might misbehave because of something in your mix that is causing
it to misbehave that you can’t necessarily hear. To give you an example of what I’m talkin
about, give a listen to the following example. I have created, it’s not a particularly musical
example but created a version of a song where you hear the mix and there’s a 40 Hertz pulse
that happens at the beginning every three or four seconds or so give a listen to see
what you notice. So if you listen carefully would you probably
heard is that the audio that you could hear was ducking and it was ducking in response
to this 40 Hertz tone and my guess is that many of you in your listening environment
couldn’t hear the 40 Hertz tone. So, we got a challenge here. We’re witnessing a symptom of something being
problematic about the audio but we can’t hear the casue, right, now I think everybody probably
recognizes what the issue is here now if you can see behind me I’ve gotten really big speakers
and a really big room to support them and lots of low-frequency resolution so I can
hear everything in the audio spectrum so I wouldn’t be surprised if you were saying yourself
well that’s fine but I can’t afford your big speakers and I understand that. So what are some things that you can do to
help you compensate for that. Let’s talk for a minute about headphones. Headphones are a wonderful tool to complement
your main monitoring environment. They can give you a relatively inexpensive
way of getting a good shot at hearing the full spectrum and diagnosing problems that
may be a little bit hard or impossible to hear in your main monitors in your room. So I would definitely advocate as a wise investment
for getting some decent headphones. It wouldn’t surprise me if you end up spending
150$ or $200 at the lower end to get something that’s got good resolution through the bass. Having said that I think as a general proposition
the most people accept that or believe that it’s better to listen through speakers that
headphones. There are things about headphones that are
unusual in that they cover your ear and they prevent was called cross feed from the right
speaker to the left ear the left speaker to the right ear as well as the closer more direct
path. And while there are bits of software sometimes
it’s built into playback devices D to A converters to help simulate this idea of cross feed you
should just know that if you do most of your working headphones you may make mistakes regarding
imaging and maybe even tone so that a recording my translate well to other people wearing
headphones but not necessarily so well out into environments where people are listening
through speakers whether it’s handheld speakers or in rooms where there are speakers playing
out into the air Rule of thumb, use speakers but feel free
to use headphones to augment your ability to hear what you need to hear. So assuming that you’ve done the best that
you can with your listening hardware and your listening environment we need to think about
what you’re going to use to measure what you’re doing against. What you’re going to use her as a reference. Y know,  the same way that all of us have
developed this internalized reference of what a guitar sounds like or what a drum sounds
like, we weren’t born knowing we learned that by reptition over and over and over again
a guitar plays and you’re like oh that’s a guitar. Mastering engineers and people who do mastering
if they practice enough they begin to develop an internalized reference of level and tone
but that comes through practice and repeated exposure. If we are going to develop this internalized
reference we need to develop a series of reference materials to help us begin to understand what
good tonal balance sounds like and what proper level sounds like. So I’m going to talk about it some of the
strategies for doing that. So the first thing is you want to begin to
collect or curate a library of material that sounds good to you and will post a link to
a Spotify playlist that you can go to and listen to good sounding mixes a good sounding
masters. But I would encourage you to start to develop
your own library of files. It’s important to think about where those
files come from. If you were to record the stream coming from
a streaming service they all play at different levels and at different qualities of fidelity
so if you’re not careful about selecting good material to use as reference material to help
you educate your ears you may be calibrating to something that’s actually not the best
case. It may actually play back quieter than what
the original master was in which case it would lead you to a wrong conclusion or loud or
distorted or what have you. So couple of guidelines here first of all
if you’re going to curate a library collect a series of files that you download directly
whether it’s from iTunes or whether it’s from one of the high resolution file websites where
you can buy a lossless audio or even you know go find some CDs and rip those CDs directly
into your library that gives you the best shot of collecting material that sounds as
much like the original Master as possible. It won’t sound exactly like the highest-resolution
version but it’ll be close enough for your purposes. So the next thing and this becomes a little
bit more challenging, is always playing your audio back through the same reference digital
to analog converter, now digital analog converter is something that shows up in any device that
lets you to play digital audio but if you’re playing through a mixer of any sort and you’re
playing the output of a phone and comparing it to the output of a streaming service and
comparing that to the output of a CD player those are not all the same; they don’t all
playback the same level and there may be some subtle changes even in the tone that comes
out for each. So if you move your reference you’re not actually
able to compare what you’re actually working with if that makes sense. Getting a single playback system that you
can trust and you can rely on to be your reference for level and tonal balance is incredibly
important. Ultimately what we want to do as mastering
engineers, the goal, the best outcome would be to be able to sit down at your system when
you’re about to master something, hit space bar and immediately know oh that needs to
be brighter and it needs to be louder, or that’s loud enough but it needs a little
bit more compression or you know whatever it is to be able to make those instantaneous
judgments. The best way to do that is to know, walking
in what the playback level of your system is and not change it. When you listen to mixing tutorials it’s
not unusual to hear the advice: “sometimes I turn it up for a while to get a better shot
at the bass, sometimes I turn it down for a while so I make sure I can hear the vocals
in the context of the mix” there are a lot of reasons for varying playback level in mixing. In mastering if we just leave our playback
level static and you hit play then you will get whatever playback level you have for your
system, you come back the next day and play playing back a different track and if it’s
a lot louder you’ll know that instantly cause you haven’t mucked around with a playback
level okay, so how do you do that get 12 tracks, 10, 12 tracks from a variety of records from
your favorite genre and load them all into a timeline in your DAW. And then do a needle drop, by needle drop
on me and just take your playback head and park it you know in almost the the loudest
section where the hottest section of each one of the tracks. You probably noticed if they’re well mastered
that the level of the sound coming from your playback system doesn’t change a lot you can
go from track to track to track the track and not mess around with the playback level. Get your SPL (sound pressure level measuring)
device people is a phone with a sound pressure level meter you can get a whole bunch of different
software or app sound pressure level meters that work on a phone. Hold it about well more or less where your
head would be when you’re listening and as you’re going from track to track the track
look at the readout and what you want to end up with is something in the neighborhood of
85 DB SPL. That’s kind of the magic number you can be
a little more or a little less but 85 DB SPL is a great target because that’s where our
hearing is the most even you won’t fatigue when listening at that level and it’s a good
point of reference. You adjust the playback on your machine playing
back those tracks to 85 DB SPL and now take a mix and put it in the timeline and hit play
and you will notice that it doesn’t sound like everything else in your timeline. It will become immediately clear what way
it’s different okay… So you begin to notice “oh I see everything
that’s mastered sits at this level and has a certain total balance to it I know now when
I listen to something else I’m about to master what I need to do with that track to make
it sound more like everything else in that timeline” Once you got that make a note whether it’s
a mental note of where in the software control your playback level is or if you have a hardware
controller as I do here in the studio make a note of the position of the playback level,
 that is your mastering. So anytime you sit down the master something
you put your playback level in that setting and that’s your starting point and now immediately
you’ll have a sense of what you need to do to adjust the level and ultimately to adjust
the tone of the track. At the same time once you got that set up,
take a look at the meter that’s present at the output of your DAW when you’re playing
your track you’ll notice that the the average level of the tracks you’re playing are sitting
at more or less the same volume whether it’s – 10 or – 12 dbfs you can make a mental note
of that and now…well mastered equals 85 DB in the air equals -12 on your meter and
you’ve made this equivalency and you can use that as a point of reference to inform what
you do in your mastering work. All right so I’m going to call this next section
your echo chamber you live in your own echo chamber of thought. One of the greatest challenges when you are
trying to master your own mixes is to revisit decisions that you’ve made and do something
different. One of the advantages of collaborating with
the mastering engineer that somebody else is they can listen to what you’ve done and
they hear it differently they hear in a different environment and they hear it in a different
context which is their own experience and their own brain so if you spent hours and
hours and hours in a mix making something sound the way you wanted to sound why would
you then change it in mastering? Now if you got a great mix you may not want
to change very much you may want to just a little bit more high end or a little bit more
bass you may want to change the level a little bit and we’re good to go in that case fine,
 but you do miss the advantage of that collaboration. Here’s a weird trick that I like to use actually
not a weird trick but I have a weird idea. So the trick is after you’ve been working
on a track for a while go find somebody else in the house in the hallway put him off the
street I don’t know by him a lemonade to get them to come in and sit down next to you in
the studio. They don’t have to say anything but just by
inviting someone else to come in and sit next to you for me it changes my brain and I hear
things differently it’s almost as if I can hear it through their ears and sometimes the
thing that’s obvious that I totally missed because I’m so focused on something else becomes
apparent to me. Now I’m going to spend a minute or two talking
about your studio setup there’s so much literature out there and there’s so much to be said about
room acoustics and design sometimes there are things that you can do to improve your
environment that cost nothing at all or very little. If you want to build the perfect room chances
are you probably can’t make a business plan to support that but anyway I don’t want to
be presumptuous but let’s talk about some of the basic core ideas around setting up
a listening environment. Most people are familiar with these but the
first thing is make sure that you’re listening environment is set up in such a way that you
are equidistant from the speakers you got an equilateral triangle between speakers in
your ears and that you have some symmetry in terms of where you are positioned in a
room. If you’re all the way off to one side so that
you’re closer to a boundary on one side of the stereo image than the other that will
certainly cause you to hear things in a way that’s less accurate. You’ll get comb filtering another kind of
sound pollution from one direction compared to the other so symmetry is important. The worst place to listen and most environments
is right in the middle of the room because all of the unevenness the room modes are going
to collide to the greatest extent in the geographical center of your room. So she can be about a third of the way back
from the front wall or two-thirds of the way back from the front wall those are better
starting points. Don’t put your speaker’s right next to a boundary
because right next to a boundary unless you feel like there’s a deficiency in the bass,
the boundary will exaggerate the low frequency response and if you put your speaker in a
corner it’s going to be that much worse. You’ll get basically double that phenomenon. So those are a few basic ideas maybe one more
to consider is if you have the luxury is to set up your playback system so that the front
plane the stereo image is oriented across the narrow wall and not the wide wall. That way the first reflection coming off the
wall behind you will take longer to get back to you and that first reflected sound is the
one that has the greatest possibility of interacting with what you hear coming from your speakers. It’s one of the reasons that you’ll find
people relying more on midfielder near-field speakers to eliminate the influence of the
room but in an ideal world you have a great room and great speakers and you can back off
a little bit and you get the best shot of hearing everything in the sound a good proportion. I’m going to call this next section you can’t
clean your kitchen floor with a dirty mop the point is that we want to have the most
control in mastering of the result. And if were using gear that has a particular
kind of color that comes from a particular kind of distortion not that there aren’t times
and places for that but in general your toolbox should be full of gear that allows you to
only make the change you want to make and not add anything. The problem with colorful gear in mastering
is that if it imparts a particular kind of color the assumption is that that kind of
color would suit every recording. And every genre and everything that you’re
doing. Now if your master in your own material and
you’re only making one genre and I’ll just say you but say it’s electronic dance music
of some sort or other and you get a little bit more upper harmonic edge from the EQ that
you use that might be a cool thing but if you want to be versatile and be able to treat
lots of different kinds of material and maybe have the opportunity to not impart that edge
but make something sound a little bit fuller or bigger or smoother you want a tool that
cleaner that’s more versatile that has the option to change the character of the tool. In mastering we tend to seek out tools that
are both exacting and also don’t have a sound of their own unless we really need color in
which case we’ll go looking for it. Thanks for joining me for this episode of
Are You Listening if you want to be notified about future episodes as we roll them out
please subscribe to the iZotope YouTube channel and use the little bell icon to set up the
alerts that will notify you when they’re released and please go to the iZotope website you can
feel free to download a free trial of Ozone and I look forward to seeing you next time
hope you find this useful.

100 Comments found

User

etienne chenard desrochers

Awesome again thank you for this

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1 N Only Aditya !

worth it

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User

Isaac Yong 楊征宇

I just want to express my thanks to iZotope and Jonathan for putting up such great videos. Two videos in I’m already learning so much more. Keep up the great work!

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AlonsoNanoMoreno

Finally learned something new (On Youtube) after 1 or 2 years, thanks for those tips.

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Journey To The View

this is incredible content learned so much thank you

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Goran Simonoski

This was so good, I had to watch it twice! Thank you guys! 🙏

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Pablo Varela

Isn´t 85 dB SLP too louder or there is some distance consideration that you may add?

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Ko rd

Which headphone are those ?

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Nick PA

Thank you for the lessons thus far. The more information shared only brings out the best in everyone. Please continue to teach, as your method is perfect for your audience.

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Vibhu Pranat Dixit

Spectral Analysis and Fourier- Transformation can really help a lot in getting what you want. But still, it requires a good amount of knowledge in physics and a little of electronics too.😅. But again, the tips in the video can also take you to a decent level.👍

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Love for Music

Jonathan Wyner, a name I can trust. New producer like me, and all the experienced producer will be benefited from this. 🙏

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Eric Hood Music

Thanks for sharing the knowledge. This was very helpful!!!!

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User

Allen Joseph

Great presentation again! VERY informative for established professionals and beginners alike!

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User

EMHmusic

That mixed/mastered song “CapeTown” by the Yellowjackets is one is of thee best acoustic jazz mastered tracks I’ve heard.

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User

fig. 8

you made more! thanks

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Luis Hernandez

Question! Is the 85db spl using a C weighted scale?!

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Luis Hernandez

Guys if yall look on the video he has the meter set to db-A so unless izotope comments otherwise im gonna go ahead and assume he means 85dbs spl A weighted

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Spin360

OH NO!
You forgot to make a proper cut or fade at 10:41!
Listen from 10:40, it's right after "reference".

I CANT TAKE YOUR ADVICE LIKE THAT!?

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TheCrystalyne

Indeed, go and buy some CD's!!! How about not even mentioning streaming services for such references purposes….

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Andrew Gene

Great tips. Super useful info and a great compliment to the plugins.

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EvoSae

13:30 is such a great piece of advice. Very well said!

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Xave Ryan

Wow…this info is insane. I love iZotope software so a big shout out to the guys for these great vids.

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莫龍山

Oh. My. God. This series is gold.

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Fortune

Amazing info thank you kindly

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Boom Kitty

Thank you for making this series. These videos are outstanding and very helpful.

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Mark Cotton

Another brilliant episode full of so much great advice. Thank you.

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Jacob Harley

This is awesome stuff. Please continue this series!

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david jonathan

having someone come in on a mixing or mastering session DOES have a huge immediate effect on how one hears it.. it is magical!

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陰湿課痕

Great Tips Class… thankyou!!!

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PROJACKED

Symmetry in speaker placement doesn't work as the way we think, they can't be excactly symmetrically pointed because of stuff in the room. Comb filtering will probably happen faster when set up equilateral.
Speakers should be set up by imaging bass and then vocalists and the height of the vocalists, as if placing around a circle….

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Ralf Weifenbach

Thank you so much, that you share all your knowledge and experience. It´s a gift.

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Carlo Libertini

Solid advice!… Great examples too. Thank you again!

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PR

Love these video series, well done guys !!

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SteampunkBelladonna

I do everything wrong. I can afford a pair of 12's but I don't because this ain't 1970 (dammit) and very few of our listeners have the Marantz or Magnavox sound with speakers that doubled for end tables. Trying to be modern… I record and finish out at a fairly live volume on an old pair of Sony MDR CD570's, which I have re-padded twice, and surprised they still live went looking for a modern similar sound replacement, which I found in the CAD MH310. Then I check the end result on a $150 "bookshelf" home stereo, and then earbuds. I can't imagine anything sounding good on a cellphone or laptop, so don't bother there.

This probably works for me because I've used the Sony headphones for years for everything, so I know what everything sounds like on them. Maybe a bunch of people will tell me I'm stupid, and maybe they're right. But ears are like snowflakes, we don't all hear the same. Ya'll gotta find and use what makes the little hairs on your arms stand up. And then stay with that.

Note that you very well may want a brighter mix for mp3 than wav / CD. Also I am not pro – but a happy hobbyist, which could be good or bad, the good being I don't have to cut corners to meet time frames, the bad being since I'm not a top of the pops producer, who cares what I think or do. Well, I have recorded demos for musicians starting out that got them jobs, so I reckon I do something right now and then, even if by accident.

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ForsenE

awesome information ! 🙂

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Andy Nonimuss

• First off, you should mix and master at 83 dB or less and not at 85 dB. After only 8 hours, 85 dB can cause permanent damage to the hair cells in the inner ear, leading to hearing loss.
• Second, never ever use any smartphone as an SPL metering device. Depending on the phone model, they can be off by as much as +/- 10 dB!

• Third, to protect your ears and prevent hearing loss, get a quality Class 1 ( +/-1.0 dB accuracy) or Class 2 ( +/-1.5 dB accuracy) SPL meter. I personally use a Testo 815 Class 1 SPL meter.
• Fourth, the SPL meter itself needs the ability to be adjustable for calibration. You can calibrate your SPL meter with something like a CEM SC-05 calibrator ( +/-0.5 dB accuracy) or a Reed Instruments R8090 calibrator ( +/-0.5 dB accuracy).
• Fifth, using a Class 2 SPL meter with a ( +/-1.5 dB) margin of error plus the margin of error in the calibrator device ( +/-0.5 dB) is a total of ( +/-2 dB). A Class 2 meter showing 83 dB could actually be 85 dB and the same Class 2 meter showing 85 dB could actually be 87 dB! So that's the reason for using 83 dB as the maximum safe listening level.
• Sixth, the overall lesson is to stop listening to this age-old advice of monitoring at 85 dB (and using a highly inferior cell phone as a metering device) to protect your ears from permanent hearing loss!

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Jimbeaux

I thought I was crazy for experiencing the "second listener" effect. Simply by showing your work to another person will change how YOU hear it. Mistakes you never heard will jump out. LOL it's crazy.

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NultyMusic

I recently purchased Neutron 2 and Ozone 8. I can't wait to start using them and get better mixes/masters. Thanks for the video 🙂

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Mimidhof

Thank you Jonathan. You give Izotope pluggin a great value with your educative video. Thank you Izotope to bring to us Jonathan 's advices. Probably one of the best of this era.

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Red

this is amazing, there's just so many little real value info on youtube, thankss

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RecordingStudio9.com

Thanks. Very helpful indeed.

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Fifty7

He should write a book, i'd buy it straight away!!!

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Abacus 2 Studios

i've bought and read loads of times the Bob katz Mastering audio the "Art and the Science" and it's great. But this video added lots of confirmation for things i've got right and lots of things that need to change for me. What a brill video and a brilliant delivery too. You know your stuff Jonathan and your a cool chap."Double bonus". Any chance of making bought paid for videos similar to the Alan Parsons range and possibly sticking to the final mastering if that's what you want ?. I'm sure the more people see it and start to understand it the more chance of selling the software?hardware required to do it. Thanks anyway absolutely great. I'll share it well with the like minded.

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Alyson Castonguay

This is invaluable. Thanks so much for making these videos!

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Andrej L.

Great and comprehensive video indeed! Yet, I wouldn't dare using the mobile phone app to measure the sound pressure level in such a serious facility as mastering room is.

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Christoph Schade Composer

I am happy that you are using Samplitude Pro. An underrated DAW I like to use for years.

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Caverna do Louco

Excellent !! Thank you so much

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KRAZETV

Excellent video !!

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Mike Heebz

Thank you iZotope for working with Jonathan Wyner to share this very important knowledge. I've been watching so many videos on learning the art of mixing & mastering & nothing has been so clear & helpful as this series! I appreciate your efforts in helping us all to better our creative work & the music that is going out into the universe! Peace + Love! =)

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Jack Loree

Thank you for this. Well said.

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Mix Movement

Still Dre. lol That's awesome 🙂

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stephen callaghan

nice video , but when I play the Spotify tracks they sound so high in treble and volume ??

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Niven A. Nolte

Thank you, Mr.

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Robin Thorpe

WoW!.. Thank you! You have explained everything that I need to know to get to the next level 😃
You have drawn a line in the sand as to Mastering/Mixing .. YES!!

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Panky

Thank you sir for making this kind of series . These video clear my all confusions and make me more confident Thank you so much Sir

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Robert Cummings

The trick you explain at 13:30 is something that I've observed countless times over the years. Having someone else next to you in the room somehow changes our perception, it's amazing. Great series!

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BadWealth Productions

Jonathan is the GOAT

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Kagiso Kgabo

Thank you.. Very polite/gentle manner of teaching..

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Michael Weinstein

Not gonna lie, kinda dug the LF pulse during the opening few bars

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MovieKid Techlife

what was the spl app used in this video would love to know

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Fedja Juvan

Thank you very much for these condensed, easy to comprehend tips. Extremely helpful! Respect!

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Pawan Thapa

Wow. I am amazed. Cool series.

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gilberto plantai

thanks to all for these amazing videos, great pieces of advice!

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NB BEATS

Great video! Great advices and next time i will definitly think twice about choosing a coloring eq for mastering or not. essentially i always choose a coloring eq/comp in mastering – why? cause it works in the mix so why not 😀 but it was a good point to think about wheather we really need that or not

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wasupthere

thank you

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mrunconventional

Thanks for this series, very useful information. – But – please stop using blurred transitions in your videos.

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Draztiq Meshaz

13:50 YES! That's totally weird and a real thing

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BuzzBeats - MODERN INSTRUMENTAL BEATS

Thanks for all the knowledge and insides shared within those amazing free tutorial series! Keep them up and coming! Much love!

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James Viice

13:38 love this idea

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Paul Vash

I absolutely agree with the tip of bringing in another person to listen to the mix. I don't know why, but when someone new is listening you become hyper-aware of all of the sounds…and issues magically present themselves.

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Aria Stone

That is so interesting about having another person in the room and how it changes your brain! I experience that when I play a song I have done to someone and all of a sudden I am hearing things I didn't notice before. Thank you for sharing that.

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RockmannMusic

13:40 Buying someone a "lemonade" would not work in my country ; ) Nice basic advice for the beginners or for the pre-beginners. Just listen kids, but don't forget, you have to buy speakers first before putting your ears in the triangle

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Bryan Chi Music

13:45 That!!! Happens to me every time!!! So weird but it's true

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MattRob

This man is very knowledgeable. I really wish I could just sit down 1 on 1 and take notes and ask questions and just shadow him. Man if only

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Hokum Tribe

super on point, thanks

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Dheeraj Badhan

the idea at 13:00 happens with me many times when i am mixing.

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Chengzhi Dai

Great ideas and techniques!!!!Thanks for sharing

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KidOhChi Kid'Oh'Chi

You are a very, easily understood teacher- Bravo sir!

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KidOhChi Kid'Oh'Chi

Out of all disciplines, finding videos on learning how to master my mix have always been the hardest and most elusive to find-¿!?
Thank you sir-

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Pissed Off

To me recording is like drawing a 2d square. Mixing is like taking the 2d square and adding the dimensions to make it a cube. Mastering is then taking the image of the cube adding shading and color in the right places and amounts to the point where you'd think you could literally grab the image the cube off the paper on your desk

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Jonas Memborg

LANDR keeps trying to tell me Mastering is a pain. I find it fascinating.
– Thanks once again to iZotope and Jonathan for making these videos. They are much appreciated.

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Daju

I suspect that the logic behind the "wierd idea" of having someone else in the room and suddenly hearing things that could be better that you didn't hear before has to with added pressure to your self confidence. Like you're more critical of yourself when you feel that someone else is possibly judging you.

Although I think that only works on certain people who care about what others think and become more aware of their own mistakes that way while someone else might be very critical of themselves already and others might be too confident to the point of overconfidence regardless.
But I think it's worth trying out to see if it works because even if you think others opinion don't sway your own we're not always correct about ourselves.

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TheMetalmaniac68

All of these videos are outstanding. Simply brilliant. They have helped me quantify my tracks, and understand that loudness isn't everything. Thank you.

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Derek Pegritz

I always tell folks to learn to read your meters and histograms. You can mix and master using a shitty $20 set of cans or even computer speakers if you know how to look at an EQ or stereo separation graph and relate those visuals to sound. That said, your ears are ALWAYS your starting point, so having better devices to produce sound for your ears to analyze from the start is vital. You've got to have a proper starting point!

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Ericson Presents...

Get a Subpac! And all your bass problems will be solved!

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vitaminfian

Just superb

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Hugo Bechstein

Wonderful series. Thank you for these…

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Tayller Ramos

2:00 song name please!!

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david lincoln brooks

Thanks, Jonathan and iZotope for a great series. I'm finding, in my fledgling attempts to mix and master music… is that I tend to HATE the sound of compression! And I mean, on every sonority/instrument I might deploy it on. Yet I know it's necessary. Hate it, that is, unless I am really going for a highly compressed sound, such as trying to emulate the peculiar sound of the Beatles' 1960's piano tracks, where they are so compressed, they don't even sound exactly like a piano anymore (and that was the point, perhaps: to establish a kind of sonic "glue" or "60's mush" that would meld the whole song together, suitable for oldschool AM airplay). Otherwise, I tend to always find disfavor with what a compressor has done to virtually any sonority.

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Bro Mo

Curious if anyone out there has used the subpac to augment headphone or regular listening? Was turned on to it recently and its a fascinating way to think about audio (the physical sensations)… but sstill not totally convinced how I should use it (or if I should use it at all) as a key reference point for my mastering. Thoughts?

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Danols

The sound meter advice is just aaaawesome thanks!

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Alessandro Natale

THIS IS GOLD.

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SCI Audio

Thank you for the awesome series. Could we get some references examples for electronic music? Im always finding it hard to agree on one sound. Electronic music producers tend to all have different ideas of what the tonal balance of lets say Progressive House may be.

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Tuexday

Has the song featured in this video been released? If so, how can I hear it?

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Will B

"Headphones…" (puts on $6,000 planar headphones lol).

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greenmark greenmark

wow its so powerful this this video

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Liam Martin 2: Electric Boogaloo

Buy Stax

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Wolfgang Gunther

This was great to see you and the family are doing well and that you are I will be in touch soon with the other two I think I'm gonna be a good time for me to get up and get away with that or I can make you a hug for me if you can talk to you about the positive thing I want to be able but it's really hard to get up early tomorrow to go to bed soon and I don't want you to be happy and healthy New year to you too and your family is doing well and I hope you have a great day at school todayand I don't know if you can make it work but I don't know if I can help you with that kind of money to be made to the hospital and they are not going to sharted again for your time and consideration imagine how hard you will be there for the interview on the instrumental in the office tomorrow and will be there at the same time as the other one is trashing this is the first time I have ever seen in the office tomorrow and will be there for the interview on the

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Anil Chauhan

13:53 Happens with me too 😀

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Tmp Name

If you monitor exclusively with headphones, or exclusively with speakers, do you end up with a mix that is only great on the chosen medium? If you mix with both speakers and headphones, do you get a mix that is of average greatness? Seems like a game of compromises in the name of inclusive listening?

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